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Elizabeth Cook joins Twitty musical cast

Tuesday, March 31, 2009 – "Conway Twitty, The Man, The Music, The Legend, The Musical," the story of the singer has told by his children, added country singer Elizabeth Cook to the cast. Cook will portray of one Conway's daughters, Joni Twitty, in the musical.

"We are thrilled to have Elizabeth Cook join our 'musical' family," said Joni Twitty, daughter of musical legend Conway Twitty. "She is an extremely talented woman who's southern charm and beautiful voice will be a great addition to our amazing cast."

"Elizabeth brings the right combination of actress, artist and attitude to a show that is already receiving stellar reviews in its first season," said producer Robert Williams.

Cook, the youngest of 11 half-brothers and sisters, grew up in rural Florida where her musician parents met while playing in local country bars. Cook's latest CD, was "Balls." She currently hosts her own Sirius XM Satellite Radio show, Apron Strings, weekday mornings on the Outlaw Country channel.

Cook said Twitty's music became as much a part of her life as "Sunday afternoon fish fries." "One of my earliest memories is sitting on my daddy's knee in Lakeland Civic Center in rural central Florida. A dazzling Conway and Loretta stood like singing dolls in the center of the stage, him in a silky suit with rings on his fingers, her in a long, hot pink gown and magnificent black hair. That image is burned in my mind."

The musical production, created and directed by Randy Johnson, produced by Poppy Production, Robert Williams for Downunder Theatricals and Scott Welch for Scott Welch Management, is touring across the country.

More news for Elizabeth Cook

CD reviews for Elizabeth Cook

Exodus of Venus CD review - Exodus of Venus
Elizabeth Cook's "Exodus of Venus" is a difficult record to sit through. Not because of the music, which is filled with high quality sounds from start to finish, but because of its painful content. For instance, when an album features a song with a title like "Methadone Blues," about a drug used to treat heroin addiction, you realize right away you're not in the realm of squeaky clean mainstream country. Cook has had some rough patches along the way, and "Exodus »»»
Welder CD review - Welder
On her latest release (the title is a nod to her father), Elizabeth Cook is as full of sass and vinegar as ever, and her hick valley-girl recitation El Camino ("If I wake up married, I'll have to annul it/Right now my hands are in his mullet"), the marital advice she offers up in Yes to Booty and the wry portrait painted by Rock n Roll Man will likely end up being the record's popular favorites, and for good reason. But other songs may turn out to be more enduring: »»»
Balls CD review - Balls
Elizabeth Cook has come up with another album of unvarnished country music, delivered by her thick-as-molasses twang and solid, stripped-down honky-tonk backing. The album is stuffed to the gills with reasons to listen that ought to attract the attention of anyone partial to contemporary iterations of traditional country. There are shuffles galore, from "He's Got No Heart" and its classic wordplay ("he's got no heart that I know of... I'd shoot him down if I knew »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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