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Rockie Lynne becomes first artist of new label

Tuesday, September 4, 2007 – After releasing his debut last year on Universal South, Rockie Lynne found a new home on a brand new label, Robbins Entertainment. Lynn became the first artist of the label's Nashville division.

"Rockie is a talented triple threat singer, songwriter and guitar player with an amazing work ethic," says label president Cory Robbins. "His potential in this format has not yet even begun to be tapped. We're proud to have signed him as our first country artist."

Lynne has spent most of 2007 touring and writing songs for his upcoming release. His debut Robbins Nashville single, "I Can't Believe It's Me," goes to radio this fall.

"I feel like I've really found the right home with this label," said Lynne. "The longer I am in this business, the more I value smart and dedicated people. I am fortunate to have the support of Cory Robbins and (vice president of A&R) Phyllis Stark behind me."

Lynne wrote or co-wrote all of the songs on his self-titled debut, which spawned a top 30 song with "Lipstick."

New York-based record label Robbins Entertainment made its long-planned expansion into the country music market by opening a Nashville division, known as Robbins Nashville, in May. Sony BMG distributes both Robbins Entertainment and Robbins Nashville.

Robbins launched Robbins Entertainment in 1996. The independent label has had numerous successes in the pop and dance music markets, including scoring such top 10 pop hits as Cascada's "Every Time We Touch," D.H.T.'s "Listen To Your Heart" and DJ Sammy's "Heaven."

Prior to Robbins Entertainment, Robbins was president and co-owner of Profile Records, a seminal label in the rap, reggae and pop music scenes known for such hit acts as the multi platinum-selling Run-D.M.C., DJ Quik, Rob Base, and Judy Torres.

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Rockie Lynne has the long hair and chiseled good looks of another guy making his first appearance on the C & W charts - Jon Bon Jovi. Lynne's country cred is more legit, however. He grew up in Statesville, N.C. in a strict Southern Baptist family who didn't approve of any music other than church music. But Euterpe's hold on the young man was a strong one, and other than a stint in the Army, music is the only job he's ever had. He wrote or co-wrote every song, and if some of them are a tad »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
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