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Earls of Leicester win big at IBMAs

Thursday, October 1, 2015 – The Earls of Leicester were the big winners tonight at the Internaitonal Bluegrass Music Assocaition Awards by taking four, including the coveted Entertainer of the Year and Album of the Year for its self-titled debut, at the awards show in Raleigh, N.C.

The band also took home Instrumental Group of the Year, and Gospel Recorded Performance of the Year. Earls of Leicester member Jerry Douglas' win for Dobro Player of the Year and Earls' member Shawn Camp's Male Vocalist of the Year win.

North Carolina's own Balsam Range won Vocal Group of the Year, Song of the Year for "Moon Over Memphis," and the group's Tim Surrett earned Bass Player of the Year.

Bill Keith and Larry Sparks were inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame.

Hosted by The Gibson Brothers, the show featured performances by The Earls of Leicester, Flatt Lonesome, Hot Rize, The Del McCoury Band, The Gibson Brothers, and a surprise performance by Alison Krauss and Larry Sparks.

The list of winners is:

Entertainer of the Year: The Earls of Leicester

Female Vocalist of the Year: Rhonda Vincent

Male Vocalist of the Year: Shawn Camp

Vocal Group of the Year: Balsam Range

Instrumental Group of the Year: The Earls of Leicester

Song of the Year: "Moon Over Memphis," Balsam Range

Album of the Year: The Earls of Leicester, The Earls of Leicester, Jerry Douglas, producer

Gospel Recorded Performance of the Year: "Who Will Sing for Me," The Earls of Leicester

Instrumental Recorded Performance of the Year: "The Three Bells," Jerry Douglas, Mike Auldridge, Rob Ickes

Emerging Artist of the Year: Becky Buller

Recorded Event of the Year: "Southern Flavor," Becky Buller, with Peter Rowan, Michael Feagan, Buddy Spicher, Ernie Sykes, Roland White, and Blake Williams

Banjo Player of the Year: Rob McCoury

Bass Player of the Year: Tim Surrett

Dobro Player of the Year: Jerry Douglas

Fiddle Player of the Year: Michael Cleveland

Guitar Player of the Year: Bryan Sutton

Mandolin Player of the Year: Jesse Brock

Inductees into the Bluegrass HOF: Bill Keith and Larry Sparks

Distinguished Achievement Award: Alison Brown, Murphy Henry, International Bluegrass Music Museum, "Bashful Brother" Oswald Kirby, Steve Martin

More news for The Earls of Leicester

CD reviews for The Earls of Leicester

Earls of Leicester Live at the CMA Theater in the Country Music Hall of Fame CD review - Earls of Leicester Live at the CMA Theater in the Country Music Hall of Fame
To suggest The Earls of Leicester are bluegrass royalty is no false decree. Unlike other self - proclaimed members of the traditional hierarchy - kings, queens, dukes and such - this sextet comes by the honor naturally: it's their name! Four - time International Bluegrass Music Association Entertainers of the Year-the association's premier annual recognition-The Earls of Leicester have spent five years bringing their interpretation of peak Flatt & Scruggs-1954 through 1965-to »»»
Rattle & Roar CD review - Rattle & Roar
In the spirit of "if it was a good idea the first time around, it's got to be worth trying again," Jerry Douglas and his collaborators in the Earls Of Leicester return with a follow-up to their self-titled Grammy-winning debut of two years ago. On the off chance that you missed it the first time around, Douglas pulled the band together, not as just another "tribute" band, but to try and capture the full spirit and exceptional musicianship of the Flatt and Scruggs shows »»»
The Earls of Leicester CD review - The Earls of Leicester
In 1946, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were integral parts of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys when they recorded a series of singles that most historians of the music consider the "birth of bluegrass" as we know it, though the term "bluegrass" would not come into widespread use for another decade or so. Upon leaving to form their own band, The Foggy Mountain Boys (much to Monroe's consternation), they spent most of the 1950s recording one landmark single after another. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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