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17 years later, The Cox Family is back

Thursday, July 30, 2015 – Seventeen years later, The Cox Family is back.

With Allison Krauss producing, the Louisiana-based family band is returing on Oct. 23 with "Gone Like the Cotton," its first release since it started work on the very same album in 1998. The new disc will be out on Rounder, which initially released their music

"Seventeen years ago, we walked out of a little studio in Nashville after completing a good bit of the lead vocals for what we thought to be a true exemplar of the kind of music that represented our sound. Seventeen years later, we walk back through that same door," said group member Sidney Cox. "There's Alison, sitting in the same spot beside Gary Paczosa, right where we left him, just like nothing had ever happened. I remember Gary spinning around in his chair and saying, 'Where have you guys been? We've been waiting for you.'"

The Cox Family consists of Evelyn, Suzanne and Willard Cox on vocals and Sidney Cox on vocals and Dobro.

Krauss brought The Cox Family to the attention of Rounder Records in the late 1980s, where they released a string of albums, including 1994's Grammy-winning "I Know Who Holds Tomorrow,"a collaboration with Krauss.

The Coxes signed with Asylum Records and released "Just When We Were Thinking It's Over," their major label debut album, in 1996. Recording sessions for "Gone Like the Cotton" began in 1998, but shortly thereafter, label executive changes at Asylum left the Coxes without a champion. The project was shelved, and the Coxes were dropped.

Last year, a chance conversation about The Coxes with former Asylum label President Kyle Lehning and John Esposito, President & CEO of Warner Music Nashville (home to the Asylum catalog), led to the resurrection of the album. Krauss and original album engineer Gary Paczosa joined the project.

"I can't remember when I've been lucky enough to be witness to a story where such generosity and talent come together so perfectly," Krauss said. "I've had the time of my life getting to work on the record again. The Cox Family hold a place in my heart like no other and listening to them for all of us is like coming home."

"Fate and chance met in a conversation with Kyle( Lehning) where I learned of this hidden gem of an album from this amazing family band," said Esposito. "When we engaged with Alison and the Cox Family, we all got excited and knew we had to complete this album. Music and artistry are the cornerstones of Warner Music Nashville. Art is timeless, and we are thrilled to be a part of bringing this special album to the world 17 years later."

The Coxes contributed a song, "I Am Weary, Let Me Rest" to the surprise smash-hit soundtrack for "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" and made a brief appearance in the film. Shortly after the Cox Family finished work on "O Brother," the elder Coxes, Willard and Marie, were critically injured in an automobile accident. Family matriarch Marie recovered completely from her injuries a few months later, but bandleader and fiddler Willard permanently lost the use of his legs. The group eventually resumed touring, but their recording career was indefinitely placed on hold.

Songs on the disc are:
1. Good Imitation of the Blues (Patrick Bryer)
2. Lost Without Your Love (David Gates)
3. Cash on the Barrelhead (Charlie Louvin-Ira Louvin)
4. Desire (Kim Richey-Stephen Kolander)
5. In My Eyes (Kostas Lazarides)
6. Good News (Kevin Brandt)
7. Let It Roll (Kevin Brandt)
8. I'm No So Far Away (Garth M. Fundis)
9. Honky Tonk Blues (Charles Cline-Curly Ray Cline)
10. Too Far Gone (Sidney Cox-Suzanne Cox)
11. I'll Get Over You (Richard Leigh)
12. Gone Like the Cotton (Sidney Cox-Suzanne Cox)

Musicians on the album include members of Krauss' Union Station band: Barry Bales on bass, Ron Block on guitar and Dan Tyminski on violin. Bruce Bouton on pedal steel, Sam Bish on mandolin, Jim Horn on sax, Viktor Krauss on bass, Sonny Landreth on guitar, Pig Robbins and Matt Rollings on piano and Andrea Zonn on fiddle all played on the disc.

CD reviews for The Cox Family

Gone Like the Cotton CD review - Gone Like the Cotton
The title of this new release from the Cox Family - their first in close to two decades - is a testament to their own hard experience that, especially in the music business, you can be riding high one day, then the next you're yesterday's news. Throughout the 1990s, the Coxes (father Willard, daughters Evelyn and Suzanne and son Sidney) from Cotton Valley, La. were among the hottest acts in bluegrass and the emerging country-based genre now known as Americana. Their collaboration with »»»
Just When We're Thinking It's Over
After three highly-acclaimed releases on Rounder Records, The Cox Family have moved on to a major label. Happily, the Cox sound is basically the same and that the family's Number One booster, Alison Krauss, is still producing this country band from Louisiana. Willard Cox is the patriarch of the band. Daughters Suzanne and Evelyn share much of the lead singing. These ladies possess two of the sweetest voices anywhere. Son Sydney, best known for writing powerhouse tunes for Krauss, contributes »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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