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Dot signs first act

Thursday, June 12, 2014 – Dot Records signed female duo Maddie & Tae as the inaugural act on the new imprint, under the Big Machine Label Group.

"Two years ago, we took a picture outside the (Big Machine) building as we imagined one day signing with the incredible label. Now, it feels completely surreal to have our wildest dreams become reality. We are in awe of being the first artist to help launch the legendary Dot Records and excited to kick off this journey with the amazing BMLG family," shared Maddie & Tae in a statement.

Their sound was influenced early on by the Dixie Chicks, Shania Twain and Lee Ann Womack.

Maddie & Tae's debut single "Girl In A Country Song" will impact radio this summer.

General Manager Chris Stacey said, "I am thrilled and honored that Maddie & Tae will be the first act to be released on Dot Records. They are phenomenally talented young ladies who have captured a sound that is unique in today's country music landscape, and I believe that they will send a message to the world that can't be denied."

Respectively from Texas and Oklahoma, the 18-year-old singer/songwriters grew up performing in similar circles prior to catching the attention of Big Machine Music Vice President Mike Molinar and staff writer/producer Aaron Scherz.

Three days after graduating from high school last June, Maddie & Tae moved to Nashville for a development summer camp. The pair earned a full Big Machine Music publishing contract.

The Dot label dates back to 1950 and was active until 1977. The label was this year through a joint venture between Big Machine Label Group and the Republic Records unit of Universal Music Group, which owns the original Dot Records catalogue.

Artists included Louis Armstrong, Pat Boone, Roy Clark, Donna Fargo, Freddy Fender, The Kendalls , Hank Thompson, Don Williams and Barbara Mandrell.

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