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Stray Cats founder Lee Rocker plans new CD

Monday, July 16, 2007 – Stray Cats founder Lee Rocker will release a new solo disc in August. Look for an Aug. 14 release for "Black Cat Bone" on Alligator for the bassist/vocalist.

The disc from Rocker and his band (guitarists Brophy Dale and Buzz Campbell, and drummer Jimmy Sage) includes 10 Rocker originals (and 1 co-written with Dale), 1 song by Campbell and covers from Bob Dylan ("One More Night") and Leon Payne ("Lost Highway," made famous by Hank Williams).

This summer, The Stray Cats will reunite once again to play in the U.S. with its original lineup including Brian Setzer and Slim Jim Phantom.

CD reviews for Lee Rocker

Racin' the Devil CD review - Racin' the Devil
Lee Rocker, the bass slappin' former Stray Cat, has forged a smart mix of country and Rev. Horton Heat influenced rockabilly resulting in one of his finest discs ever. Joined by his regular crew as well as Buzz Campbell of Hot Rod Lincoln, Rocker tears through such classic genre themes as fast cars ("Funny Car Graveyard"), intense partying ("Rockin' Harder") and dangerous women ("The Girl From Hell"). Employing Link Wray era fuzztone power chords, they transform two well-known songs from Rocker's »»»
Lee Rocker Livel
Whereas last year's "No Cats" found ex-Stray Cats bassist Lee Rocker trying a lot of different directions, some with more success than others, "Live" is far more consistent. Rocker fronts a tight quartet and focuses on a mixed bag of rockabilly and blues numbers plus live versions of several of the better numbers from "No Cats," including "Miracle In Memphis," "Love Me Good" and Leon Russell's "Little Piece of Your Love." The focus here, however, is on Rocker and band just playing a bunch of songs they like. »»»
No Cats
Like his erstwhile bandmates Brian Setzer and Slim Jim Phantom, bassist Lee Rocker has had a difficult time in establishing an identity for himself outside of the Stray Cats. This finds him trying out a number of musical guises under the big "Americana" tent. The album starts off strongly with "Rumblin' Bass," a rocking little number featuring some distinctive lead guitar work from ex-Cars guitarist Elliot Easton (who is also heard on a slightly odd version of Blondie's "One Way Or Another"). »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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