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Billy Joe Shaver readies spiritual disc

Tuesday, July 3, 2007 – Billy Joe Shaver gets spiritual on "Everybody's Brother," out Aug. 7 on Compadre. John Carter Cash produced the disc of songs about love, loss, death and the afterlife.

"Get Thee Behind Me Satan" starts the disc with John Anderson and Shaver trading off on lead vocals. Other guests include Marty Stuart, Tanya Tucker, Kris Kristofferson, and Randy Scruggs. The album's final track is a late 1970s duet with Johnny Cash on "You Just Can't Beat Jesus Christ." It was produced by Cowboy Jack Clement and features Shaver's late son, then 15-year-old Eddy Shaver playing guitar.

Native American singer/songwriter Bill Miller adds pow-wow drums, Native American cedar flute and Native vocals to the title track for a soundscape that pays tribute to America's oldest music. "It was my idea to mix cowboy and Indian music," Shaver says. "I'm Blackfoot on my father's side, and Bill's a full-blood Mohican. He did a wonderful job."

The track list is:
1. Get Thee Behind Me Satan (with John Anderson)
2. Rolling Stone
3. When I Get My Wings
4. If You Don't Love Jesus
5. Most Precious
6. Winning Again (with Marty Stuart)
7. No Earthly Good (with Kris Kristofferson)
8. To Be Loved By A Woman
9. The Tough Get Going
10. The Greatest Man Alive
11. Played The Game Too Long (with Tanya Tucker)
12.. You'll Always Be My Best Friend
13. Jesus Is The Only One That Loves Us (with John Anderson)
14. Everybody's Brother (with Bill Miller)
15. You Just Can't Beat Jesus Christ (with Johnny Cash)

Shaver is touring the U.S. in support of the CD.

Compadré is owned by Music World Entertainment, the company owned by Matthew Knowles, father of Beyoncé.

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Long in the Tooth CD review - Long in the Tooth
Billy Joe Shaver does a lot of looking back on life and the travails of love on his first release since 2008's "Everybody's Brother." That's understandable given the rough-and-tumble life of Shaver, who lived up to the outlaw country moniker of his music. Shaver continues in the long line of ace Texas singer/songwriter types like Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark. Shaver puts his cards on the table on the opening "Hard to Be an Outlaw." With help from Willie »»»
Live at Billy Bob's Texas CD review - Live at Billy Bob's Texas
Waylon and Willie and Johnny and Kris may have lit the fire of public awareness, but those in the know will likely attest to the fact that when the so-called outlaw country movement first took flight, it was Billy Joe Shaver who helped lead the charge. His album "Old Five and Dimers" remains an undisputed classic of the genre, the perfect prototype when it comes to hard-bitten narratives with a rowdy, rambunctious appeal. Likewise, no one questioned his credibility when he unabashedly »»»
Everybody's Brother CD review - Everybody's Brother
There's often a fine line between sin and salvation and, like most outlaws, Billy Joe Shaver has one foot in the honky tonk and one in the church pew. Shaver has long expressed the desire to record a "gospel" album and it's fitting...the same weathered voice that speaks convincingly of barrooms and broken hearts is also perfectly suited for singing the praises of Jesus. And it's not like religion is a little-traveled path for Shaver; he has typically included a spiritual »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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