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Bare, Clement, Rogers join Country Hall

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 – Bobby Bare, "Cowboy" Jack Clement and Kenny Rogers will become the newest members of the revered Country Music Hall of Fame, it was announced today.

Rogers will be inducted in the "Modern Era Artist" category, while Bare will be inducted in the "Veterans Era Artist" category. Clement will be inducted in the "Non-Performer" category, which is awarded every third year in a rotation with the "Recording and/or Touring Musician Active Prior to 1980" and "Songwriter" categories. Bare, Clement, and Rogers will increase membership in the Country Music Hall of Fame to 121 members.

"The highest musical honor achievable for a country music artist or industry leader is to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, and these are all outstanding and highly deserving individuals," said Steve Moore, CMA Chief Executive Officer. "'Cowboy' has been responsible for producing many of the iconic songs in country music. Bobby pioneered the country concept album and was one of the first artists to take the format to Europe. And Kenny's crossover success throughout a lengthy career introduced country music to a much wider audience."

"This is big - an honor and the validation of a dream, totally unexpected," said Bare. "Now I'll be famous forever. Thanks to all of my supporters and thank you CMA."

"I've been chosen for the Country Music Hall of Fame? I thought I was already in the Hall of Fame," said Clement. "I could have gotten in there any time I wanted. Kyle (Young) gave me a key."

"When I was young, my dad said, 'Son, you have to think big to accomplish small' and the Country Music Hall of Fame was as big as it gets," said Rogers. "He wanted that for me. So every record I've ever made, every concert I've performed, and every song I've written was done for the single purpose of achieving that goal."

"I'm sure you can imagine how special it is and how exciting it was when Steve Moore called me with the news of my acceptance. It's not the end of my journey, but it is certainly the high point, no matter what else I accomplish. From the bottom of my heart, I want to thank all the members who voted for me and all the friends who encouraged and believed in me, and my dad, for his vision of success."

Induction ceremonies for Bare, Clement, and Rogers will take place at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in the new CMA Theater later this year. Since 2007, the Museum's Medallion Ceremony, an annual reunion of the Hall of Fame membership, has served as the official rite of induction for new members.

"The announcement of new Hall of Fame members is always a cause for celebration," said Kyle Young, Director of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. "I find it remarkable that all three 2013 honorees were born in the 1930s during the worldwide Great Depression and commercial country music's formative years. They were present for the birth of rock 'n' roll, the '60s folk revival, the ascent of hard country, and the rise of sophisticated pop country with a global impact. Cowboy Jack, Bobby and Kenny are unique personalities whose contributions to the canon of American popular music are inerasable."

More news for Bobby Bare

CD reviews for Bobby Bare

Things Change CD review - Things Change
Hipsters may only consider checking out Bobby Bare's "Things Change" due to the participation of hot item Chris Stapleton, who sings on a remake of the old hit "Detroit City." Hopefully, though, they'll immediately recognize Bare's immense talent and stick around for the whole shooting match. Bare's no spring chicken anymore, but he sounds extremely good throughout this classic-sounding country effort. Bare's singing voice may not be a thing of country »»»
Darker Than Light CD review - Darker Than Light
For this album, Bare picks a playlist of 16 longtime favorites ranging from traditional folk songs to recent hits. The ones that work the best are the classics. Bare's husky baritone and truck driver-friendly delivery are perfect for the Woody Guthrie classic Going Down The Road Felling Bad and the loping Boll Weevil, a tune he learned from Tex Ritter back in the 1950's. Farewell Angelina, a Dylan tune made famous by Joan Baez, is delighfully simple, a thoughtful interpretation steeped »»»
The Moon Was Blue CD review - The Moon Was Blue
On his first solo album since 1983, Bobby Bare proves that while his voice has frayed with age, he can still change any song into a powerful personal statement. Co-producers Mark Never and Bobby Bare Jr. ape '60s country crossover by employing cooing female back-up singers along with strings and horns. Most of the songs are pop hits from an earlier era that Bare essays with his trademark sense of laconic melancholy. As a result, the 11-song set has the feel of unfinished business finally being addressed. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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