Exile, Adkins play colon cancer benefit

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 – Exile headlined last night's The Stars Go Blue for Colon Cancer benefit at the Country Music Hall of Fame's Ford Theater.

Trace Adkins joined them for a performance of their hit Kiss You All Over, and Wade Hayes joined the group for their hit, Super Love. Hayes, who is undergoing treatment for stage IV colon cancer, received a standing ovation before chatting with the crowd emotionally about his diagnosis, treatment and the importance of screenings. Hayes said several days ago that hew as tumor free, although he has four more months of chemotherapy.

Money raised from The Stars Go Blue event benefits The Blue Note Fund which provides financial assistance to those going through treatment who are in need. Grammy-nominated producer/musician Charlie Kelley created the event and the fund after recovering from colon cancer at age 40.

CD reviews for Wade Hayes

Place to Turn Around CD review - Place to Turn Around
When a conversation about country music starts with the phrase, "Whatever happened to..." - Wade Hayes' name comes to mind. The Bethel Acres, Okla. native was a rising star in the mid-1990's, opening up for the likes of Brooks & Dunn. His music leaned traditional at a time when Nashville was veering towards pop-country. It's been nine years since his last album, but Hayes picks up where he left off with the same honky tonk sounds and tender ballads that landed him on the »»»
When the Wrong One Loves You Right
Wade Hayes shot out of the box on his debut, hitting the top. The follow-up CD wasn't as successful with the songs not quite as strong, but here he regains his form. That's evident from the lead-off title track with Hayes' trademark baritone spurring the song, complete with fiddle from Larry Franklin and good guitar lines. Hayes honky tonks it up the most on "Tore Up From the Floor Up," the original title cut, and Hayes follows the advice of the title. Ditto for "Are We Having Fun Yet," which he »»»
On a Good Night
They say lightening never strikes twice in the same place. Wade Hayes and producers Don Cook and Chick Rains haven't heard. Everything about Hayes' second album is an effort to duplicate the formula that worked so well on Hayes' debut. Along with the tunes penned by Hayes and Rains again you'll find one each from Jim McBride and Brooks & Dunn. Again, the tunes spring to life behind Hayes' beefy baritone, slithering guitar playing and swaggering grooves. While the songs don't quite measure up to »»»