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The Jayhawks return to action

Monday, June 6, 2011 – "Mockingbird Time," the new album from The Jayhawks, will be released Sept. 20 on Rounder Records. The 12-track album is the first full-band studio release featuring both founding members Gary Louris and Mark Olson since 1995's "Tomorrow the Green Grass."

Summer tour dates are now confirmed with additional fall shows to be announced shortly.

Louris told Rolling Stone magazine, "Our goal is to make the best Jayhawks album that's ever been done. Mark and I both feel that there is some business left undone, and we got together and wrote some great songs."

In addition to co-writing all the songs with Olson, Louris also produced the record. "Mockingbird Time" was recorded in Minneapolis at The Terrarium Recording Studios over a month's time during the winter of 2010. Other original band members featured on the record include Karen Grotberg (keyboards, vocals), Tim O'Reagan (drums, vocals) and Marc Perlman (bass).

"The difference from then and now is that Mark and I have both experienced different kinds of music and expanded our palates," said Louris. Both artists enjoyed solo careers after leaving The Jayhawks.

"So this record has moments of experimentation and a bit of worldliness. I like a well-crafted, in-and-out kind of song, but with Mark, the lyrics dictate the music, and he'll go off into interesting, asymmetrical compositions," Louris said. "So, it's a nice balance. Certain things were meant to be-like peanut butter and jelly-and Mark and I just work well together. And having done a lot of co-writing during the last six or seven years, I'm more appreciative of the magic that we have together. That doesn't come along very often for anybody."

The band's first career-spanning anthology "Music From The North Country" was released in 2009 by American/Legacy. In August 2010, for the first time on CD, the self-titled debut album from the band (often referred to by fans as The Bunkhouse album) was reissued by Lost Highway Records. In January, the band's first two albums for American Recordings-"Hollywood Town Hall" (1992) and "Tomorrow The Green Grass" (1995)-were re-released with bonus tracks.

In conjunction with these reissues the original Jayhawks line-up shared the stage for the first time in more than 15 years in January, performing in Minneapolis, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia and Toronto.

The tracks are:

1. Hide Your Colors

2. Closer to Your Side

3. Tiny Arrows

4. She Walks in So Many Ways

5. High Water Blues

6. Mockingbird Time

7. Stand out in the Rain

8. Cinnamon Love

9. Guilder Annie

10. Black Eyed Susan

11. Pouring Rain at Dawn

12. Hey Mr. Man

Tour dates are:
July 2 Chicago, IL Taste of Chicago
July 3 Milwaukee, WI Summerfest
July 6 Winnipeg, MB Winnipeg Folk Festival
July 8 Minneapolis, MN Basilica Block Party
July 10 Chicago, IL DMB Caravan Chicago
July 16 Vancouver, BC Vancouver Folk Festival
July 29 Sos del Rey Catolico, Spain Luna Lunera Festival
July 30 Santander, Spain Infest
July 31 Alicante, Spain Auditorium
Aug. 2 Birmingham, UK HMV Institute
Aug. 3 Glasgow, UK ABC
Aug. 4 Manchester, UK Academy 2
Aug. 5 London, UK Forum
Aug. 6 Heuveland, Belgium Dranouter Festival
Aug. 8 Amsterdam, Holland Paradiso
Aug. 9 Hengelo, Holland Metropool
Aug. 10 Copenhagen, Denmark Amanger Bio
Aug. 12 Oslo, Norway Oya Festival
Aug. 13 Gothenburg, Sweden Way Out West
Aug. 14-15 Helsinki, Finland Tavastia
Sept. 17 Mankato, MN Riverfront Park

More news for The Jayhawks

CD reviews for The Jayhawks

Back Roads And Abandoned Motels CD review - Back Roads And Abandoned Motels
The Jayhawks' "Back Roads and Abandoned Motels" is an album mostly made up of songs front man Gary Louris wrote or co-wrote for other projects, ranging from the Dixie Chicks to Jakob Dylan. For the most part, these songs just sound like great Jayhawks songs because that Louris vocal quiver is one of Americana music's most recognizable and heart-tugging sonic signatures. Therefore, it's momentarily off-putting when Karen Grotberg takes the lead on album-opener "Come »»»
Paging Mr. Proust CD review - Paging Mr. Proust
The Minneapolis-based alt.-country/roots rock stalwart The Jayhawks is back at it again in the wake of the most recent split between founding members Gary Louris and Mark Olson. If longtime devotees had any reservations about the band's first studio album in nearly half a decade and the first without Olson since 2003, the sunny acoustic rock sound and trademark harmony vocals of "Quiet Corners & Empty Spaces," the lead track on "Paging Mr. Proust," should put them at ease. »»»
Sound of Lies CD review - Sound of Lies
Time has been kind to The Jayhawks' "Sound of Lies," originally released in 1997. The album was also the first one recorded after Mark Olson (one half of the original songwriting partnership with Gary Louris) had left the group. Nevertheless, these many years later, songs like "It's Up To you" are pleasing still with their country goodness - especially in contrast to the annoying Southern rock influence upon today's omnipresent mainstream bro-country scene - »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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