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Washburn gives preview to Prelude

Thursday, August 19, 2010 – Abigail Washburn, member of Uncle Earl and a clawhammer banjo player, will preview her forthcoming album this September during the "Prelude Tour."

Washburn will release "City of Refuge" in early 2011 with producer Tucker Martine (The Decemberists, Spoon, Sufjan Stevens).

Straight from a tour of China, the band will feature songwriting collaborator and multi-instrumentalist Kai Welch, drummer Jamie Dick, bassist Jared Engel and fiddler Rob Hecht.

Recorded in Nashville, Washburn and Tucker received help from Welch, guitarist Bill Frisell, old time fiddler Rayna Gellert and guzheng (the ancient Chinese zither) master Wu Fei. Ketch Secor and Morgan Jahnig of Old Crow Medicine Show, Chris Funk from The Decemberists and Carl Broemel of My Morning Jacket.

Tour dates are:

Aug. 29 - Charleston, WV Mountain Stage Radio Show

Sept. 8 - Nashville, TN AMA Showcase at the Station Inn

Sept. 10 - Goshen, IN LVD's

Sept. 11 - Chicago, IL Old Town School of Folk Music

Sept. 12 - Ann Arbor, MI The Ark

Sept. 16 - Bloomington, IN Lotus World Music Festival

Sept. 21 - Vienna, VA Jammin' Java

Sept. 22 - Annapolis, MD Ram's Head on Stage

Sept. 24 - New York, NY Joe's Pub

Sept. 25 - Norfolk, CT Infinity Hall

Sept. 27 - Northampton, MA Iron Horse

Sept. 28 - Somerville, MA Johnny D's

Sept. Sept 29 - Middlebury, VT Middlebury, VT

More news for Abigail Washburn

CD reviews for Abigail Washburn

City of Refuge CD review - City of Refuge
Well known in the folk/acoustic world for melding Appalachian old time music with ancient Chinese folk, Abigail Washburn's work with Uncle Earl and the Sparrow Quartet is nonetheless scant preparation for the scope of her latest project. "Afterquake," an album of folky electronica she put together after the 2009 Chinese earthquake with Chinese-American DJ and producer Dave Liang, may be a better indicator of the expansive, multi-genre mindset at work here. The cast of musical »»»
Song Of The Traveling Daughter CD review - Song Of The Traveling Daughter
Among all the loosely and imperfectly defined genres that we employ tocategorize and make some sort of sense out of the music we hear and buy, there may be no more difficult music to accurately describe than "old time" music. To many ears, it's confined to the realm of high-energy Appalachian string bands, while to others, it includes the bluesy and occasionally bawdy songs of the likes of Jimmie Rodgers and Charlie Poole. Still others think of bluegrass as being part of old time though, while »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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