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Jimmy Wayne keeps on walking

Tuesday, July 27, 2010 – Six states and 1,700 miles later, plus a lot of blisters, Jimmy Wayne is closing in on Phoenix. The singer is less than 100 miles away from the final destination of his Meet Me Halfway walk, begun in Nashville on Jan. 1.

"This has been one of the most challenging, and at the same time rewarding experiences of my life," Wayne said. "I know that might sound strange, but it's true. This journey has made me think back on the childhood I had - there were many nights I didn't know where I would sleep and had no idea if I'd have any food."

"Even today, there are kids out there facing the same problems-nowhere to go, no one to care for them. It's just amazing that in this country child homelessness and hunger are still issues. If this walk has helped even one child find a permanent home with a caring family, it's been worth every step. And if me doing it all over again would help another, I'm ready."

Once Wayne hits Mesa, Ariz. On July 31, he and his band will take over Toby Keith's I Love This Bar and Grill to perform a free and open to the public concert to say thanks to everyone who has supported him on this journey.

Wayne hopes to have even more support when he crosses the finish line at HomeBase Youth Services in Phoenix the next morning. People are invited to meet him at Indian Steele Park at 8 a.m. Pacific time on Sunday Aug. 1 and walk the last half-mile to HomeBase with him. That same night, Wayne will perform a special invitation only concert for area foster children at the Hard Rock in Phoenix. Wayne plans to broadcast the concert live via ustream, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Pacific. Just prior to kicking off the show, he will talk with the kids and staff back at Monroe Harding in Nashville through Skype.

Wayne plans to keep the Meet Me Halfway Street Team and supporters busy with new ideas and projects to help him continue to raise awareness of homeless teens.

More news for Jimmy Wayne

CD reviews for Jimmy Wayne

Sara Smile CD review - Sara Smile
Sometimes the third time out for an artist can mystify them, as by this point they've chosen to either clone or deconstruct their first record. So what's next? Jimmy Wayne, who sharply veered away from the deep emotional mining of his first effort to more straightforward country- pop on his second, goes the route of a hybrid collection. There's the big leadoff (and Keith Urban-penned) Things I Believe, which swings for the number one hit fences all the way with a hook heavy »»»
Do You Believe Me Now CD review - Do You Believe Me Now
Jimmy Wayne's turbulent childhood as a foster child and teen delinquent, and his personal journal writings, fueled many of the songs on his self-titled debut, painting him as a survivor and poet with a strapping, emotional voice and a penchant for vulnerable story songs. He brings more of these dramatic tales to his soulful sophomore effort (and first on the new label). In Kerosene Kid, Wayne reminisces about facing his classmates' jeers each winter, as he smelled of the kerosene he »»»
Jimmy Wayne
One wants desperately to like Jimmy Wayne - though he's just 30, he's already had enough trouble to last several lifetimes. But though "Stay Gone," the first single from his self-titled debut, has much to recommend it, it's one of the few bright spots in a generally undistinguished album. The basic problem isn't hard to see. Though he's a good songwriter with solid songwriting skills - 8 of the 12 cuts have his name among the credits - the production here surrounds him with generic country-pop »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: With or without band, Isbell satisfies – Usually, when an artist performs without his regular backing band, it becomes about mathematics of subtraction. That artist is armed with far fewer artistic weapons at his/her disposal, after all. In Jason Isbell's case, though, when he performed with just his wife and fiddler Amanda Shires, it was more about substitution than subtraction.... »»»
Concert Review: Grammy nominations aside, Yola, Kiah are the real deal – Grammy nominations do not make the artist, but Yola and opener Amythyst Kiah underscored time and again on this night that the honors were well deserved. In fact, Yola and Kiah's other group, Our Native Daughters, are nominated in the same category - Best American Roots. Yola has three other nominations as well. The clear winners... »»»
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