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Junior Sisk, Ramblers Choice return in June

Wednesday, April 28, 2010 – After scoring in 2009 with "Blue Side of the Blue Ridge," which announced the rebirth of his band Ramblers Choice, Junior Sisk's second Rebel Records release, "Heartaches and Dreams," hits stores June 8.

From the Tom T. & Dixie Hall-penned opener (and first single) Train Without A Track to the closing remake of a Bill Monroe gospel song, Let The Light Shine Down, the disc includes 12 songs.

Nine songs are originals, including those penned by Sisk and cousin Tim Massey plus new contributions by Bill Castle, Matt Jones and Daniel Salyer. Sisk and band also cut songs done by the Lonesome Pine Fiddlers and the McPeak Brothers.

"Heartaches and Dreams" was recorded at Wes Easter's Eastwood Studio in Cana, Va. and marks the debut of Ramblers Choice's newest member - mandolin player Jason Tomlin. He sang tenor vocals on many of the songs.

More news for Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice

CD reviews for Junior Sisk & Ramblers Choice

The Mountains Are Calling Me Home CD review - The Mountains Are Calling Me Home
Junior Sisk & Rambler's Choice has a couple of great things going on on "The Mountains Are Calling Me Home." Foremost, the quality of the songs included; the selection is simply genius. Listeners are almost dared to find a song that is not top notch, catchy or meaningful. It cannot be done; the songs are of the highest quality. Secondly, through the years Sisk has developed a distinguishable voice among his peers. Granted, Sisk is not completely unmistakable like Ralph Stanley or »»»
Poor Boy's Pleasure CD review - Poor Boy's Pleasure
Traditional bluegrass doesn't get much more traditional these days than the kind being made by Junior Sisk and Rambler's Choice; his Jimmy Martin and Stanley Brothers inspired style feels at times as if Sisk and his band are channeling the ghosts of those giants of the genre. This collection of classic-sounding new songs follows the 'if it ain't broke' model of continuing to do what the band does best. Sisk nods directly to Martin on the tribute "Jimmy, J.D. »»»
Trouble Follows Me CD review - Trouble Follows Me
There's a direct line from classic country music to the bluegrass traditionalists, and Junior Sisk walks it better than anyone in the business. Call it high lonesome honky-tonk, a distillation of Bill Monroe's attitude into the heart of the legacy left behind by George Jones. Sisk and company are still a bluegrass band in practice as well as sound, with the standard drum-less banjo-fiddle-mando-bass lineup intact, and the pickers in Ramblers Choice are among the best in their respective fields. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Life's good for Carll, Moorer – Life's been pretty darn good for Hayes Carll. He released a new disc, the sturdy, "What It Is," and he remarried - to fellow singer Allison Moorer. Carll has enjoyed a two-decade long career as a plainspoken singer, some of it distinctly country, some of it more following in the footsteps of the great Texas singer/songwriters, like Ray... »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
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