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Amber Digby makes Opry debut

Wednesday, December 16, 2009 – Texas singer Amber Digby will make her Grand Ole Opry debut Saturday. She will sing Silent Night After the Fight, a song recorded by Ronnie Milsap many years ago. The song appears on Digby's just released fourth album, "Another Way to Live."

"I'm thrilled to death," said Digby in a telephone interview Wednesday. "I'm excited. I'm not scared to death. I've got butterflies, but every human being gets that."

"I've been spending a lot of time in Nashville writing. I've made several trips this year and made a lot of contacts there."

Digby's mother and aunt have worked with Milsap, leading to that connection. She will appear while he is hosting that particular segment of the Opry show.

CD reviews for Amber Digby

The World You're Living In
Contemporary country music in the traditional style is a genre mostly dominated by men. That's why "The World You're Living In," the latest studio album from Texas-based Amber Digby, is such a breath of fresh air. Co-produced by Digby, her touring guitar player Randy Lindley and longtime collaborator Justin Trevino and featuring top-notch players like Pete Wade, Hargus "Pig" Robbins and pedal steel master Lloyd Green, "The World You're Living In" has »»»
Another Way to Live CD review - Another Way to Live
Texas honky tonker Amber Digby's fourth release is a mix of effective originals and nicely chosen classic country covers. Digby co-wrote three songs, including the haunting Soul Survivor, the tale of a woman who perseveres after getting trapped in an abusive relationship ("She had a baby when she was twenty/By a man she couldn't stand/And to stay there in that Hell wasn't in her plan"). Less tragic are the more traditional weepers about lost love Lie To Him and After It Breaks. »»»
Passion Pride & What Might Have Been CD review - Passion Pride & What Might Have Been
Amber Digby plays and sings honky tonk music that is unabashedly classic-sounding. But while what she is doing is backward-looking, that doesn't mean that it exudes signs of a self-conscious effort to carefully reconstruct a bygone sound. Rather, Digby comes across as simply singing the music she loves in the manner in which it was sang by those who sang it first. On this, her third release, that again means a collection that foregoes original material for a full plate drawn from the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans brings the cheer – What's a country song without drinking? Morgan Evans seems to have gotten the missive loud and clear as a good chunk of his songs incorporate libations into the mix. And when the Australian-bred singer isn't confronting drinking, he's dealing with matters of the heart, but in keeping with the positive attitude he purveyed, love is most... »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
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