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Randy Owen receives radio humanitarian award

Monday, March 9, 2009 – Randy Owen received the Artist Humanitarian Award from the Country Radio Broadcasters Friday. The group also handed out Radio Promotion Awards, Radio Humanitarian Award and Tom Rivers Humanitarian Award at their annual event.

Owen co-founded Country Cares for St. Jude Kids in 1989 after meeting St. Jude Children's Research Hospital founder Danny Thomas the year before. Country Cares has raised more than $345 million to fund research in the fight against childhood cancer. Earlier this year, more than 800 members of the country music industry gathered at the annual seminar in Memphis to celebrate 20 years of support for the children of St. Jude.

Radio Promotion Awards went to: (Placement / Call Letters / Market / Promotion Title)
Large Market
1st Place: KILT/ Houston, TX/Ten Man Jam
2nd Place: WUBL/Atlanta, GA/A Taste of Trisha Yearwood
3rd Place: WXTU/Philadelphia, PA/Text 2 Win Julianne Hough at Your School

Medium Market
1st Place: KCCY/Colorado Springs, CO/Acoustic Happy Hour
2nd Place: KFDI /Wichita, KS/Christmas in a Box
3rd Place: WQMX/Akron, OH/Send Me Backstage

Small Market
1st Place: WKKR/Opelika, AL/Wall of Water
2nd Place: KRYS/Corpus Christi, TX/Independence Day
3rd Place - Tie: WFYR/Peoria, IL/Valentine and KZPK/St. Cloud, MN/We Fest

All stations were judged on the creativity and implementation of their promotions, held between Nov. 1, 2007 - Dec. 31, 2008.

Radio Humanitarian Award:
Large Market: 97.3 WGH, Norfolk-Virginia Beach, Va. Under the banner of "The Twelve Months of Eaglefest," WGH pursued year-round public service efforts. Beneficiaries included Country Cares for St. Jude Kids, the Center for Child and Family Services in Hampton Roads, the March of Dimes and the Susan G. Komen Race For The Cure. Their monthly guitar auction "Chords For The Cause" benefits a different non-profit organization each month. WGH is also involved in various military causes and provided aid to those affected by the tornadoes that ripped through Suffolk County in May.
Medium Market: 107.7 WIVK, Knoxville, Tenn. WIVK enlisted Owen to perform at a benefit concert for victims of a local church shooting and secured John Michael Montgomery to perform and help collect 1,400 pounds of food for Second Harvest Food Bank. Performances from Joe Nichols and Jewel helped raise money for improvements at local Knoxville schools Gibbs High School and Farragut High School, respectively. In addition, WIVK sponsored "Feed The Need" to help feed the homeless, as well as "Buddy's Barbeque Race Against Cancer" to raise funds for Cancer Outreach Services at the Thompson Cancer Survival Center. Radiothons have benefited Variety Children's Charity and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, among others.
Small Market: 93.3 WFLS, Fredericksburg, Va. WFLS encouraged their listeners to contribute more than $150,000 to numerous charities throughout the year, including the Children's Miracle Network, the Salvation Army, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and more. The station also enlisted listeners to donate blood to the American Red Cross, school supplies to the Spotsylvania and Stafford County School Supply Collection and food to the Fredericksburg Area Food Bank.

The CRB Radio Humanitarian Awards are presented to full-time country radio stations for their efforts to improve the quality of life for communities they serve. The 2009 Awards are presented to stations in 3 categories: Large (markets 1-50), Medium (markets 51-130), and Small (markets 131 plus) for public service performed Nov. 1, 2007-Dec. 31, 2008.

Tom Rivers Humanitarian Award: Mick Anselmo, Sr. He is CBS Minneapolis VP Market Manager. During his tenure at KEEY-FM, Anselmo organized and created a radiothon which has helped raise more than $12 million for St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. His partnership with Sharing and Caring Hands of Minneapolis during a run of Garth Brooks concerts in 1998 set a Minneapolis-St. Paul food drive record. The former Clear Channel radio executive also created Project Northern Lights, an effort that collected calling cards for troops stationed in Baghdad.

The intent of the Tom Rivers Humanitarian Award, given at the discretion of the Country Radio Broadcasters Board of Directors, is to recognize an individual in the country radio industry who has displayed a magnanimous spirit of caring and generosity in service to their community. The award is given when the board feels an individual, through outstanding service, warrants the recognition. No award was given in 2008.

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