Sign up for newsletter
 

Jerry Reed dies

Tuesday, September 2, 2008 – Country singer and actor Jerry Reed died Monday at 71 of emphysema. Reed was best known for his hit song, When You're Hot You're Hot for which he received a Grammy for best male country vocal performance in 1972. Reed also sang the theme song from the first "Smokey and the Bandit" movie, East Bound and Down.

Jerry Reed Hubbard was born March 20, 1937 in Atlanta. He wrote and sang by the time he was in high school. While a few singles of Reed's gained little notice while recording for Capitol Records, he did when Gene Vincent covered Reed's Crazy Legs in 1958. That year, Reed signed to National Recording Co. After two years in the military, Reed moved to Nashville in 1961. He continued writing and recording, charting with Goodnight Irene and Hully Gully Guitar.

Reed achieved his first hit on the charts with Guitar Man in 1967, which Elvis Presley recorded in 1967. Reed played guitar for the session with Presley. Reed later achieved a hit with an Elvis tribute Tupelo Mississippi Flash.

Reed released two albums with Chet Atkins, "Me and Jerry" and "Me and Chet." During this period, he also had his first number one with When You're Hot You're Hot. Reed had a second number with Lord, Mr. Ford.

He soon got involved in movies, starring with friend Burt Reynolds in "W. W. and the Dixie Dancekings" in 1974. Two years later, he was in "Gator," also with Reynolds. Reed also co-starred in all three of the "Smokey" films.

Reed continued charting though. "She Got the Goldmine (I Got the Shaft)" was a hit for Reed in 1982, followed by The Bird, which hit number two. His last chart hit, I'm a Slave charted in 1983. He continued acting and recording, appearing in Adam Sandler's "The Waterboy" as Red Beaulieu, a football coach. He also joined with Waylon Jennings, Mel Tilllis and Bobby Bare to form the group the Old Dogs, which recorded one album in 1998.

CD reviews for Jerry Reed

Jerry Reed Live! Still CD review - Jerry Reed Live! Still
Jerry Reed's first album in 6 years is a 10-song live set issued on his son-in-law's newly created label. Although time has taken an audible toll, the 68- year-old singer/songwriter and guitarist nonpareil imbues concert renditions of his classic hits and a few strong new numbers with palpable crowd-pleasing humor. At his best, Reed growls with trademark sass on such classics as "Amos Moses" (number 8, pop, 1970), "Lord, Mr. Ford" (number 1, c&w, 1973), and his Smokey & the Bandit-inspired smash »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Gayle, Orlando provide good old-fashioned entertainment – Although this pairing of country star Crystal Gayle and Tony Orlando may have - on the surface - appeared to be an odd one, tonight's audience demonstratively loved each performer equally. It was an evening of memorable songs, fun and funny stories and just good old-fashioned entertainment. Gayle opened the show with a strong set of country... »»»
Concert Review: With or without band, Isbell satisfies – Usually, when an artist performs without his regular backing band, it becomes about mathematics of subtraction. That artist is armed with far fewer artistic weapons at his/her disposal, after all. In Jason Isbell's case, though, when he performed with just his wife and fiddler Amanda Shires, it was more about substitution than subtraction.... »»»
Follow Country Standard Time  Subscribe to Country News Digest  Follow Country Standard Time on twitter  Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook 

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Mavericks "Play the Hits" When recording its album "Play the Hits," The Mavericks approached this covers album in much the same way the band creates any of its other studio albums. "Above all, we're always trying to reach a certain musical bar that we... »»»
Larue moves "Onward" The release of "Onward," his eighth studio album, finds veteran Texas Music/Red Dirt artist Stoney Larue at a crossroads. After almost two decades on the road, playing 200 shows a year across America and abroad, he has had success... »»»
Willis, Robison spin "Beautiful Lie" Eleven years ago, Kelly stepped away from music. She had just finished touring on 2007's exquisite "Translated From Love" and felt the angst of being a travelling musician with family at home. At that point, Willis and her husband, musician/producer Bruce Robison,... »»»
Tornillo CD review - Tornillo
The band name may suggest Appalachia and in some respects their sound does, but Lil Smokies hail from Montana, and deliver "Tornillo," their third release, which is named for the town where the studio for this release, Sonic Ranch, is located. »»»
Nightfall CD review - Nightfall
Little Big Town gets billed as a country music vocal group, but "Nightfall" plays out more like a four-headed singer-songwriter effort. Many of these songs hearken back to some of the best '70s introspective songwriter efforts. »»»
Formations CD review - Formations
Hawktail features some of the finest players of a generation in traditional American acoustic music. The product of their collaboration, "Formations," is a testament to the musical milieu in which they create.  »»»