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Longview regroups with J.D. Crowe, Lou Reid

Wednesday, February 6, 2008 – After six years, bluegrass Longview returns on April 8 with "Deep in the Mountains" (Rounder). This is the band's fourth recording, but the first with new members J.D. Crowe, Ron Stewart, and Lou Reid. The disc includes traditional bluegrass from the southern mountains; to the first classic ensembles of Bill Monroe, Jim & Jesse, and the Stanley Brothers and extending into the newgrass revolution ignited by Crowe's band, The New South.

Longview was originally meant to be a one-time-only gathering of Don Rigsby, James King, Dudley Connell, Marshall Wilborn, Joe Mullins and Glen Duncan. They came together at the request of Rounder Records cofounder Ken Irwin, to mark the label's 25th anniversary. The CD reached the Top 15 on Gavin's Americana chart, and won the International Bluegrass Music Association's 1998 Recorded Event of the Year and Song of the Year awards.

On "Deep in the Mountains," harmonies remain as the centerpiece of Longview. Reid takes Connell's place singing tenor on "Old Log Cabin" and Rigsby adding high baritone to "Weathered Grey Stone," a song written by Connell. King's baritone takes the lead.

Crowe still leads The New South. Stewart (fiddle) is a prolific session musician and a multi-instrumentalist. Guitarist Reid plays with the Seldom Scene and was a founding member of Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver and a member of Ricky Skaggs' band. Wilborn has played bass for the Johnson Mountain Boys, Lynn Morris and Jimmy Martin. King is considered one of the best male ballad singer in bluegrass and mandolinist Rigsby is a veteran of the New South and Lonesome River Band.

"When I'm playing," Rigsby said, "my goal is to make them all sound good; and that's their goal, too. Because if I can't make them sound good, they're not going to be able to make me sound good. That's just one of the laws: the whole is no greater than the sum of its parts. That's bluegrass physics."

The songs are:
1. Eating Out of Your Hand
2. Weathered Grey Stone
3. Room at the Top of the Stairs
4. Don't Leave Me Alone
5. Old Log Cabin
6. Cotton Eyed Joe
7. I'll Love Nobody but You
8. Baptism of Jesse Taylor
9. I'm Gonna Love You One More Time
10. At the First Fall of Snow
11. I Love You Yet
12. Georgia Bound

More news

CD reviews

Deep in the Mountains CD review - Deep in the Mountains
Longview is the ultimate bluegrass pick-up band, featuring six of the best musicians on the scene today. This is the group's fourth recording over more than a decade and the first in more than five years. Founding members Don Rigsby (mandolin), James King and Marshall Wilborn (bass) are joined here by new Longviewers J.D. Crowe (banjo), Ron Stewart (fiddle) and Lou Reid (guitar). The material is a good mix of the familiar and more under-the radar bluegrass tunes. There's also a nice »»»
Bluegrass Holiday CD review - Bluegrass Holiday
What a trip down memory lane! This J. D. Crowe reissue takes you back to when it began in 1968 (with 4 bonus tracks previously only available as King Bluegrass Records singles). Crowe was a veteran of the Sunny Mountain Boys, but played close to home (Lexington, Ky.) for several years after leaving Jimmy Martin. Bobby Slone and Doyle Lawson joined with Crowe, playing music at night at the Red Slipper Lounge and working "real" jobs during the day. Then, Red Allen joined them, and fans »»»
Lefty's Old Guitar CD review - Lefty's Old Guitar
This is classic Crowe. Instead of resting on laurels, J.D. Crowe continues to front a band with drive and precision. While unquestionably bluegrass, New South also dabbles in a country sound on several tracks featuring Ricky Wasson's smoky baritone, reminding the listener of 1950s country singers. The addition of subtle touches of pedal steel achieves the desired country effect on both the title cut, "Lefty's Old Guitar," and the closing "She Knows When You Are On My Mind Again. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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