OCMS's Secor moves show from internet to radio
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OCMS's Secor moves show from internet to radio

Wednesday, August 5, 2020 – Hartland Hootenanny, the weekly variety show created by Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor, will head from the internet to the radio airwaves of WMOT 89.5 FM for a limited run starting Aug. 8 at 8 p.m. CST.

Now in its fifth month of Saturday evening YouTube webcasts, Hartland Hootenanny is an old-time barn dance of music, humor and storytelling. Originating from Old Crow's newly built Hartland Studio in East Nashville, with behind-the-camera support from bandmates Morgan Jahnig and Robert Price, the Hootenanny features Secor's All My Tales Are Tall monologues, letters from viewers (The Pan American Mailbag), the fiddle-driven Socially Distanced Square Dance and special guests in conversation and live performance. Chuck Mead, Dom Flemons, Molly Tuttle, Pokey LaFarge, Sierra Hull and The War & Treaty have all visited.

In the WMOT premiere, bluegrass guitar ace Billy Strings is on set to tell stories and play songs he learned from his dad. Chely Wright visits remotely on Aug. 15 from her quarantine base in Vermont to talk about the early days of Opryland and her story of coming out in country music. Future episodes will be announced soon. The show also can be heard at WMOT.org.

"I'm excited and proud to be joining forces with WMOT, the station that continues to set the region's radio high bar for building community," said Secor. "The Hootenanny couldn't have found a more appropriate home on the dial. Together I'm looking forward to reaching new audiences with this show which has been such a creative life raft during these crazy times."

"We are over the moon to bring Ketch Secor's new show to the air here at WMOT," said Program Director Jessie Scott. "As an avid fan of Old Crow Medicine Show since meeting them in 1999, I always look forward to their next step. Ketch and OCMS have carved out a unique place for themselves, and we are honored to be the flagship station for Hartland Hootenanny."

Other members of Old Crow have found their way into the show, chiefly multi-instrumentalist Cory Younts who acts as a socially distanced sidekick. Bass player Jahnig and drummer Jerry Pentecost have dropped by, in front of and behind the camera. The band has kept up a stream of activity during the Covid crisis, including releasing "Pray For America" single and video.

WMOT 89.5 Roots Radio is a listener-supported National Public Radio (NPR) station based at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) in Murfreesboro, Tenn.


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