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Moorer gets personal on "Blood"

Monday, August 19, 2019 – Allison Moorer will replace "Blood," an album that is a companion piece to a forthcoming memoir, on Oct. 25.

The album, due onAutotelic Records / Thirty Tigers, is Moorer's first solo album in four years.

Moorer is also putting out "Blood: A Memoir," on Oct. 29 through Da Capo Press, an imprint of Hachette Books. The book is a detailed account of Moorer and her sister's (Grammy Award winner Shelby Lynne) childhood growing up in a troubled home in southern Alabama, which ended with the murder-suicide of her parents in 1986.

Moorer had avoided going into the details of the abuse, alcoholism, intimidation, poverty

The CD contains 10 tracks that directly connect to the people, emotions, trauma and state of mind that are all detailed in the memoir. Shortly after their parents passing, Shelby Lynne found the unfinished lyrics to a song in their father's briefcase, which she wrote the music for. "I'm The One To Blame," recorded bare, with only Moorer's vocal and acoustic guitar, is a powerfully moving confessional. Moorer addresses depression and heartbreak ("Bad Weather"), terrified young sisters clinging to each other for support ("Nightlight"), the deep rooted character of their mother ("The Rock And The Hill"), unfulfilled voids that resides within ("All I Wanted") and the emotional finish line she hopes to reach one day ("Heal").

In 1999, Moorer penned "Cold Cold Earth", a song about her parent's last hours on earth, but did not release it then. Her long time producer Kenny Greenberg, who produced "Blood," convinced her to release it as an unlisted hidden track on the album "The Hardest Part" (2000). Moorer chose to reclaim the song on "Blood" and officially reveal it to the public.

More news for Allison Moorer

CD reviews for Allison Moorer

Blood CD review - Blood
Allison Moorer's new disc, billed as a "companion piece" to her recently published memoir of the same title, stands powerfully as a "musical memoir" on its own. Moorer is a gifted singer and songwriter, but the book and album tell a real-life story that she has struggled for more than three decades to come to grips with. Tragedy struck Moorer at the age of 14 when her father, Franklin Moorer, a musician and alcoholic with abusive tendencies, shot his wife Lynn (the »»»
Down to Believing CD review - Down to Believing
Allison Moorer's eighth studio album may be her finest yet; her voice rings clear, soaring on the tender ballads of loss and fiercely raging through the rockers that name the ongoing struggles we all face as we maneuver in and around the vagaries of love, failure, momentary hope and disillusion. Moorer joins forces with her old producer Kenny Greenberg, who also plays electric guitar on several songs and co-wrote the title track, and though it took them two years to record the album, it was worth the wait. »»»
Crows CD review - Crows
Allison Moorer is known as much for her own material as she is for her family in sister Shelby Lynne and hubby Steve Earle. However, here, Moorer seems to move from previous Americana albums for a haunting, jazz-accented approach on the opener Abalone Sky. Think of Cowboy Junkies' Margo Timmins fronting a seasoned jazz trio, and you should get the picture for that tune and especially the engaging Should I Be Concerned. And it's a very good idea, which sets things off on the right foot. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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