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Uncle Walt's Band debut gets reissued

Tuesday, November 20, 2018 – The debut album from Uncle Walt's Band, the group featuring Walter Hyatt, Champ Hood and David Ball, will be reissued in late March.

A remastered version of "Uncle Walt's Band" with 11 previously unreleased bonus tracks will be available on CD, LP and digital from Omnivore Recordings on March 29, 2018. New liner notes come by the words of Hyatt, Hood and surviving member David Ball, plus fellow artists Lyle Lovett, Marcia Ball, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, Marshall Chapman, and journalists Peter Cooper, Doug Freeman and Michael Hall.

New liner notes include a history of each re-pressing of this private-press classic (reissued six times with different covers and sequence variations back in the '70s).

The group, originally from Spartanburg, S.C., was an eclectic music trio that moved to Nashville in 1972 and, shortly thereafter, to Austin at the urging of singer/songwriter Willis Alan Ramsey. An attempt at an album with Ramsey at the helm was unsuccessful, so the band headed back to Spartanburg in 1974 to produce its own debut LP, "Blame It on the Bossa Nova."

The original self-released vinyl edition -1,000 copies sold through performances and self-promotion - sold quickly. The group returned to Austin with a reissue of the album, then called "Uncle Walt's Band."

After taking brief hiatus, they recorded a second album, "An American in Texas," released in 1980, followed by a live album, "Recorded Live," in 1982. (A cassette-only release of studio sessions, "6-26-79," was also released along the way.

Uncle Walt's Band gained a following in Texas, but not "King Tears," produced by Lyle Lovett) and performed on Austin City Limits. Hood became a Texas Music Hall of Fame sideman playing for Lovett, Jerry Jeff Walker and others, and Ball had country hits with "Thinkin' Problem" and "Riding With Private Malone."

The first-ever, career-spanning "Anthology: Those Boys From Carolina, They Sure Enough Could Sing..". was released earlier this year.

Awareness increased when David Ball & That Carolina Sound supported it on tour. Actor/animator Mike Judge included two tracks on HBO's "Silicon Valley" last year. The band is featured in the Country Music Hall of Fame's current exhibition, "Outlaws & Armadillos."

The track listing is:
1. Ruby
2. Dish Wiped Clean
3. Little Sadie
4. High Hill
5. Four 'Till Late
6. Undecided
7. Gimme Some Skin
8. Seat Of Logic
9. Don't You Think I Feel It Too
10. In The Night
11. Aloha

LP download & CD bonus tracks:
12. After You've Gone (Demo)
13. Your Father's Frown (Demo)
14. Lonely In Love (Demo)
15. Tuxedo Tale (Demo)
16. Rollin' My Blues (Demo)
17. Time On My Hands (Demo)
18. Rock Island Line (Demo)
19. Since You've Been Gone (Live)
20. Early Riser (Live)
21. Trap For Two (Live - Waterloo Ice House)
22. Betty (Live - Waterloo Ice House)

CD reviews for Uncle Walt's Band

An American in Texas CD review - An American in Texas
"An American in Texas" was originally released in 1980 as a reunion album for the Austin-based Uncle Walt's Band with an enticing mix of jazz, folk, pop and country. The strongest country track is Champ Hood's honky-tonk tale of lost love "Last One To Know" in which Hood contemplates warning others not to suffer his fate ("Maybe I/Since I'm wise to your game/Should tell your new lover so"). Hood also contributes the jazzy "Sad As It Seems" »»»
Uncle Walt's Band CD review - Uncle Walt's Band
The self-titled debut album from Uncle Walt's Band already had a retro feel when it was initially released in 1974 with its appealing mix of jazz, folk, blues and country. The Spartanburg, S.C. trio of Walter Hyatt (guitar, vocals), Champ Hood (guitar, fiddle, mandolin, vocals) and David Ball (bass, vocals) became mainstays of the Austin music scene of the '70s following this effort. This reissue includes 11 previously unreleased tracks that nicely complement the original 11 tunes. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Lil Smokies provide the perfect antidote – On a night when the world to be falling further apart thanks to coronavirus (this would be the night the NBA postponed the season), there stood The Lil Smokies to at least in some small measure save the day. The quintet is part of a generation of musicians with bluegrass as the basis, but not totally the sum of the music either.... »»»
Concert Review: White makes the case for himself, no matter how dark the music – John Paul White opined with a glint in his eyes that his songs were not of the uplifting variety. In fact, they were downright dark. How else to explain "The Long Way" with the line "long way home back to you." Or "James," a song inspired by his grandfather who suffered from dementia. But lest you think that the Alabama... »»»
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