Presley drummer D.J. Fontana passes away
COUNTRY STANDARD TIME
HomeNewsInterviewsCD ReleasesCD ReviewsConcertsArtistsArchive
 

Presley drummer D.J. Fontana passes away

Thursday, June 14, 2018 – D.J. Fontana, a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer who played on more than 460 Elvis Presley recordings, passed away on Thursday at 87 in Nashville.

Fontana started playing for Presley in October 1954 and was with him through is comeback special in 1968.

Fontana was employed by the Louisiana Hayride to be an in-house drummer on its Saturday night radio broadcast. Presley played at the Hayride with a band that included Scotty Moore on lead guitar and Bill Black on bass, but no drummer until Fontana stepped in. The Blue Moon Boys thus were formed with Black, Moore and Fontana.

The group split in 1958, but Fontana and Presley still played and recorded together throughout the 1960s. Presley who had been active for a number of years after his return from the Army launched a widely successful NBC television comeback special.

Fontana eventually left Presley after the bands grew larger and larger. Fontana became an in-demand session player. He recorded with artists including Dolly Parton and Steve Earle. Moore and Fontana performed together without Presley, including a 2002 recording of "That's All Right (Mama) along with Paul McCartney.

Fontana was inducted into the Rock and Hall of Fame in 2009 in the sideman category.


More news for Elvis Presley


CD reviews for Elvis Presley

This is the third official go round for the live '50's recordings lovingly compiled in Good Rockin' Tonight, but that makes them no less worthwhile. Narrator Frank Page saw the whole Elvis Presley phenomena take shape from the wings of the hallowed Louisiana Hayride and his comments provide valuable context concerning the young rocker's still-developing style. Naturally the chief attraction is the Memphis Flash himself burning through the Sun-era gems "That's All Right Mama," "Blue Moon Of ...
Culled from sessions, Las Vegas concerts and rehearsals for the 1970 documentary "That's The Way It Is" captures the 35-year-old Elvis Presley still glowing from the resurrection of his 1968 comeback special and a fresh string of hits. Like many Sun Records alumni, Presley strongly related to the gospel elements that bled from soul into mainstream pop during the previous decade. Resultantly, his stage-show featured gospel back-up singers and hyped-up spiritual arrangements on an ...


©Country Standard Time • Jeffrey B. Remz, editor & publisher • countrystandardtime@gmail.com
AboutCopyrightNewsletterOur sister publication Standard Time
Subscribe to Country Music News Country News   Subscribe to Country Music CD Reviews CD Reviews   Follow us on  Twitter    Instagram    Facebook