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Lauderdale, Shires, Hot Rize release new discs

Friday, August 3, 2018 – Jim Lauderdale, Amanda Shires and veteran new grass band Hot Rize are out with discs today.

Make that two, in the case of Lauderdale. He is out with new album, "Jim Lauderdale and Roland White," which is very old and "Time Flies." These are Lauderdale's 30th and 31st albums and mark a return to the YepRoc label. "Time Flies" finds Lauderdale incorporating country and soulful sounds. He produced the disc along with Jay Weaver at Nashville's Blackbird Studio and House of Blues Studios. The collaboration with White was a previously unreleased first full-length record, a collection of classic bluegrass recorded in the basement of Earl and Louise Scruggs' Nashville home in the summer of 1979 and then lost for nearly four decades. Lauderdale was new to town, while White was already a true bluegrass legend, known for his mastery of the mandolin and foundation of such groups as The Kentucky Colonels and Country Gazette. The master tapes went missing for 39 years and were only recently rediscovered at the bottom of a box by White's wife.

Amanda Shires has enjoyed her own career, while also playing fiddle in husband Jason Isbell's 400 Unit backing band. "To the Sunset" is Shires' second disc with uber producer Dave Cobb at the helm. Recorded at RCA Studio A in Nashville, Shires is joined on this new album by special guests including Isbell (guitar), Cobb (bass) Peter Levin (keys), and Jerry Pentecost (drums). The new release is the follow-up to "My Piece of Land" from 2016.

"Hot Rize 40th Anniversary Bash, was recorded live at Boulder Theatre in Boulder, Col. over the course of three sold-out shows in January. Hot Rize (Nick Forster on bass, Pete Wernick on banjo, Tim O'Brien on mandolin and fiddle and Bryan Sutton on guitar) were joined by longtime musical friends Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan and Sam Bush. Hot Rize has struck a balance between traditional and experimental bluegrass.

More news for Jim Lauderdale

CD reviews for Jim Lauderdale

From Another World CD review - From Another World
Following the passing of the late, great James Brown, there are those that have argued that Jim Lauderdale rightfully deserves to inherit the title of the hardest working man in show business. And for good reason. An avowed and industrious multi-tasker, Lauderdale never rests, a habit that once resulted not only in his decision to release several albums in a single year, but more remarkably, multiple albums all at one time. Suffice it to say that Lauderdale has never adhered to the old adage »»»
Time Flies CD review - Time Flies
Americana's most prolific artist has delivered another strong set of performances. Jim Lauderdale's signature singing manner, distinctively unhurried with elongated phrasing emphasized in nearly every song, may turn-off some - but if you haven't come under his spell by now, there isn't much chance of conversion as we head toward the 30th anniversary of "Planet Of Love." For the rest of us, "Time Flies" causes...well time to fly. "The road is a river, »»»
London Southern
Like the genre, Americana, for which he is its face, Jim Lauderdale can be described as eclectic, uncategorizable and constantly searching for something different. It would be difficult to find another artist who has delivered with this, his 29th album in just a 26-year span of recording. This is his seventh in the last four years. Here, he channels the sounds of early '60s American soul music filtered through the British approach, having recorded the sessions in London with Nick »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lambert smiles, dances the night away – Miranda Lambert didn't perform "Tin Man," one of her best, but also one of her saddest songs during this Wildcard tour stop. It's a song sung from the perspective of one who is sad that she has a heart that can be broken. That's not the current condition of Lambert's heart, though. She's apparently in a good... »»»
Concert Review: For Brooks and fans, a most unusual change of pace – To say that this was a change of pace for Garth Brooks - not to mention his fans - would be an understatement of the highest degree. Brooks all but begged during the show to be playing next door at Gillette Stadium where the New England Patriots play. But, alas, Brooks exuded joy and excitement at the chance to play before about 500 people at a club,... »»»
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