Sign up for newsletter
 

Reports of Price death premature, but singer is failing

Sunday, December 15, 2013 – Reports surfaced Sunday that Country Music Hall of Famer Ray Price had died, but his wife said that was not true.

Price, however, appears to be in failing health.

Price's son, Cliff, posted on Facebook that his father had died. Several media outlet reported his death.

Price's long-time friend, Bill Mack, posted ""As of 7:00PM, the great Ray Price is still with us, although obviously fading from the cancer. This was verified by Janie Price less than an hour ago (6:00PM, Central). Just wanted to release this "update" because so many of you have issued your concerns. Thank you! It's been a long day since Janie called me this morning notifying me of his "failing condition", but I've had the opportunity to observe hundreds of caring, loving messages. What a deserving compliment to Ray."

Janie is Ray Price's wife.

Price left a hospital in Tyler, Texas last week for home hospice care in Mt. Pleasant, Texas. He has been fighting pancreatic cancer for more than two years.

"I love my fans and have devoted my life to reaching out to them" Price said in a statement. "I appreciate their support all these years and I hope I haven't let them down. I am at peace. I love Jesus. I'm going to be just fine. Don't worry about me. I'll see you again one day."

Price's hits include Crazy Arms, City Lights and For the Good Times.

More news for Ray Price

CD reviews for Ray Price

Beauty Is... CD review - Beauty Is...
On Dec. 16, 2013, Ray Price, succumbed to pancreatic cancer, and the world lost yet another great musician who during his career had helped change the face of country music. In the 1950s, the Cherokee Cowboy (he formed the Cherokee Cowboys in 1953, and Roger Miller, Buddy Emmons, Willie Nelson, Johnny Paycheck, and Buddy Spicher, among others, were members of the band) developed the sound that became known as the "Ray Price shuffle," which most famously can be heard on his hit »»»
Time
Fans of Ray Price's classics hardcore honky-tonk recordings of the '50s' and '60s have been hoping for one last return to form for quite a few years now - decades, actually - from the man who more or less created the style. And in spite of Price's legendary stubbornness, that return has finally come. Backed by a group of Nashville A-team studio vets, Price has finally abandoned the orchestra this time out for a long-overdue collection of shuffles, western swing and ballads like few other can deliver. »»»
Prisoner of Love
In spite of some fans' hopes that Ray Price would turn in one last great honky-tonk album, Price continues to mine the heavily orchestrated blend of country and pop that has dominated his career since 1967's "Danny Boy." In fact, the opening lines of the re-recording of Harlan Howard's terrific "Better Class of Losers" (which opens the album) could well be interpreted by some as a pointed message from Price to fans of his groundbreaking honky-tonk recordings of the '50's and '60's: "I said I'm »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Morlix overcomes album covers – Guitarist Gurf Morlix seemed ultra concerned when talking about his CD covers. Who could blame him when the two of his album covers - the just released "Eatin' At Me" and "Toad Of Titicaca" - received their share of criticism, which had nothing to do with the music contained therein? In fact, Morlix pointed out that he made... »»»
Concert Review: At Shaky Boots day 2, soggy weather doesn't dampen music – Some things are too good to last, and in Atlanta, that includes a rain-free weekend. The skies that were so clear and sunny on Shaky Boots' first day turned to rain on the second, but even that couldn't dampen the good mood of the attendees - or the good music. John and Jacob, a new group from Alabama, won the award for best-dressed... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Thanks to Wills, AATW remains the king After over 40 years of touring and recording as the founder, lead guitar and front-man for Western Swing music's standard-bearers, Asleep At The Wheel, Ray Benson has a lot of irons in the fire these days. In fact, with his TV show Texas Music Scene a hit throughout the southwestern U.S. and touring in support of AATW's new release, "Still the King: Celebrating the Music of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys," he is as busy now as ever.... »»»
Pug turns writer's block into "Windfall" In his life and career, Joe Pug has never done anything halfway. So when Pug experienced a crippling lack of creative inspiration after his punishing road schedule to promote 2012's "The Great Despiser," he didn't consider the possibility of taking a short break. Joe Pug was on the verge of throwing in the towel.... »»»
Giddens takes her turn A great deal has transpired in the 10 years between Rhiannon Giddens, Dom Flemons and Justin Robinson connecting at North Carolina's Black Banjo Gathering and the release of Giddens' brilliant debut solo album, "Tomorrow is My Turn." Giddens and Flemons formed the very successful Sankofa Springs. Robinson met and was mentored by black string band legend Joe Thompson, and ultimately, Giddens, Flemons and Robinson formed the bluegrass/folk/blues powerhouse, the Carolina Chocolate Drops. ... »»»
Sundown Over Ghost Town CD review - Sundown Over Ghost Town
It's not an overstatement to say that Eilen Jewell is Johnny Cash reincarnate - at least, that's the sound she puts forth on her seventh album, "Sundown Over Ghost Town." Jewell's melancholy vocals and simplistic instrumentation betray just enough to show each song's depth and autobiographical roots. »»»
Monterey CD review - Monterey
The Milk Carton Kids may be one of the most unlikely Americana contenders of the past few years. Relying solely on dual acoustic guitars and close-knit harmonies, they look and sound like an introspective folk duo circa the mid '60s - think Simon and Garfunkel, Peter and Gordon, or Chad and Jeremy »»»
The Malpass Brothers CD review - The Malpass Brothers
The North Carolina-based Malpass Brothers' passion for the classic country of past decades is nicely displayed on their latest self-titled release. Christopher and Taylor Malpass are most effective when they tackle brotherly harmonies as with covers of the Wilburn Brothers' "Which One Is To Blame" and the Louvin Brothers' "Satan and the Saint," »»»