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Reports of Price death premature, but singer is failing

Sunday, December 15, 2013 – Reports surfaced Sunday that Country Music Hall of Famer Ray Price had died, but his wife said that was not true.

Price, however, appears to be in failing health.

Price's son, Cliff, posted on Facebook that his father had died. Several media outlet reported his death.

Price's long-time friend, Bill Mack, posted ""As of 7:00PM, the great Ray Price is still with us, although obviously fading from the cancer. This was verified by Janie Price less than an hour ago (6:00PM, Central). Just wanted to release this "update" because so many of you have issued your concerns. Thank you! It's been a long day since Janie called me this morning notifying me of his "failing condition", but I've had the opportunity to observe hundreds of caring, loving messages. What a deserving compliment to Ray."

Janie is Ray Price's wife.

Price left a hospital in Tyler, Texas last week for home hospice care in Mt. Pleasant, Texas. He has been fighting pancreatic cancer for more than two years.

"I love my fans and have devoted my life to reaching out to them" Price said in a statement. "I appreciate their support all these years and I hope I haven't let them down. I am at peace. I love Jesus. I'm going to be just fine. Don't worry about me. I'll see you again one day."

Price's hits include Crazy Arms, City Lights and For the Good Times.

More news for Ray Price

CD reviews for Ray Price

Beauty Is... CD review - Beauty Is...
On Dec. 16, 2013, Ray Price, succumbed to pancreatic cancer, and the world lost yet another great musician who during his career had helped change the face of country music. In the 1950s, the Cherokee Cowboy (he formed the Cherokee Cowboys in 1953, and Roger Miller, Buddy Emmons, Willie Nelson, Johnny Paycheck, and Buddy Spicher, among others, were members of the band) developed the sound that became known as the "Ray Price shuffle," which most famously can be heard on his hit »»»
Time
Fans of Ray Price's classics hardcore honky-tonk recordings of the '50s' and '60s have been hoping for one last return to form for quite a few years now - decades, actually - from the man who more or less created the style. And in spite of Price's legendary stubbornness, that return has finally come. Backed by a group of Nashville A-team studio vets, Price has finally abandoned the orchestra this time out for a long-overdue collection of shuffles, western swing and ballads like few other can deliver. »»»
Prisoner of Love
In spite of some fans' hopes that Ray Price would turn in one last great honky-tonk album, Price continues to mine the heavily orchestrated blend of country and pop that has dominated his career since 1967's "Danny Boy." In fact, the opening lines of the re-recording of Harlan Howard's terrific "Better Class of Losers" (which opens the album) could well be interpreted by some as a pointed message from Price to fans of his groundbreaking honky-tonk recordings of the '50's and '60's: "I said I'm »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Henley goes his own way – When Don Henley's name pops into music conversation, chances are that the Eagles immediately come to mind instead of his solo career. The Eagles have long been a mainstay from their Cali sound of the '70s to what now would be labeled country after all these years. And it was that country vibe that Henley explored quite successfully on last... »»»
Concert Review: Screams endure for Brooks – The crowd screamed constantly for Garth Brooks on the first of three nights. This was not the Beatles at Hollywood Bowl. No, his was a 54-year-old man - one that admitted to using his acoustic guitar more as a prop to hide his gut than to create live music. Sure, it's been a few decades since Brooks last mounted a significant concert tour.... »»»
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