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Evans won't slow down in '14

Tuesday, December 10, 2013 – Sara Evans will release her seventh studio album "Slow Me Down," on March 4, 2014.

The album comes more than two years after the release of "Stronger," her second Billboard Country Album Chart number one album. The title track of the new disc, released earlier this fall is Evans' biggest first week country radio added single ever. The video featuring NASCAR great Carl Edwards is in heavy rotation on both CMT and GAC.

The release was co-produced with Mark Bright (Reba McEntire, Rascal Flatts, and Carrie Underwood) who Evans last worked with on her Platinum-selling "Real Fine Place" (2005).

Evans collaborates on three tracks" Better Off with Vince Gill, Can't Stop Loving You, a duet with Isaac Slade of The Fray and a cover of Gavin DeGraw's Not Over You with DeGraw on harmonies.

"Making 'Slow Me Down' has been a truly amazing experience," said Evans. "I had the chance to co-write with some of my favorite writers, work with Mark (Bright) and some truly incredible musicians - and now hearing what we created gives me such an incredible sense of pride. Having Isaac (Slade), Gavin (DeGraw) and Vince (Gill) sing with me, was an amazing experience, and they took those songs to another level."

"I honestly have never been more excited to have everyone hear one of my albums. I cannot wait to share it with everyone."

Evans co-wrote three of the 11 tracks. Other writers included Dave Berg (Keith Urban, Reba McEntire, Blake Shelton), Shane McAnally (Florida Georgia Line, Kasey Musgraves, Kelly Clarkson), Karyn Rochelle (Trisha Yearwood, LeAnn Rimes, Ronnie Milsap), Sarah Buxton (Keith Urban, The Band Perry, Gary Allan), and Shane Stevens (Lady Antebellum, Kellie Pickler, Montgomery Gentry).

More news for Sara Evans

CD reviews for Sara Evans

Slow Me Down CD review - Slow Me Down
Once upon a time, circa 1997, Sara Evans was a dyed in the wool traditional country singer. "Three Chords and the Truth" was the most appropriate title of her debut. But times and styles have changed in the country music world. Seventeen years later, not only is Evans not traditional sounding, she also doesn't particularly heed her own advice from the title. And that means she pretty much maintains a fast, big sounding, pop approach to the 11 songs, three songs which she co-wrote. »»»
Stronger CD review - Stronger
Six years full of on and off the grid highs and lows have passed since country chanteuse Sara Evans released any new material. The artist weathered a very public divorce, performed on Dancing With the Stars, remarried and took up novel writing. Now, at what she feels is the right time, the artist is set to reveal what it's taken to make her "Stronger." It's a less traditional sound Evans' employs on "Stronger," opting instead for more of the radio-friendly pop »»»
Greatest Hits CD review - Greatest Hits
Sara Evans started off as a hard country singer on "Three Chords and the Truth." The problem was that none of the three singles from that excellent debut were ever close to being hits. And with her career on the line, Evans opted to go for a pop sound and with that far more commercial success starting with "No Place That Far' in 1998. Evans' voice possesses a lot of twang and vocal firepower. That twang is perhaps never more apparent in her post "Three Chords" »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: 19 years later, Harris returns with "Wrecking Ball" – At one point, Emmylou Harris told the crowd that she could not believe it had been 19 years since she released "Wrecking Ball." That was most understandable because based on this concert tour devoted towards playing the left of center atmospheric disc, the song bird has hardly missed a beat. Harris' label, Nonesuch, just released a... »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff: more than just a great name – Hurray for the Riff Raff is one well-named group. Not that it signifies all that much musically, but at least it's catchy and makes you want to root for the underdog. With a lot to live up moniker wise, the band in concert - which, in reality, is lead singer Alynda Lee Segarra from New Orleans and her backing mates - more than lived up to the "pressure.... »»»
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