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Evans won't slow down in '14

Tuesday, December 10, 2013 – Sara Evans will release her seventh studio album "Slow Me Down," on March 4, 2014.

The album comes more than two years after the release of "Stronger," her second Billboard Country Album Chart number one album. The title track of the new disc, released earlier this fall is Evans' biggest first week country radio added single ever. The video featuring NASCAR great Carl Edwards is in heavy rotation on both CMT and GAC.

The release was co-produced with Mark Bright (Reba McEntire, Rascal Flatts, and Carrie Underwood) who Evans last worked with on her Platinum-selling "Real Fine Place" (2005).

Evans collaborates on three tracks" Better Off with Vince Gill, Can't Stop Loving You, a duet with Isaac Slade of The Fray and a cover of Gavin DeGraw's Not Over You with DeGraw on harmonies.

"Making 'Slow Me Down' has been a truly amazing experience," said Evans. "I had the chance to co-write with some of my favorite writers, work with Mark (Bright) and some truly incredible musicians - and now hearing what we created gives me such an incredible sense of pride. Having Isaac (Slade), Gavin (DeGraw) and Vince (Gill) sing with me, was an amazing experience, and they took those songs to another level."

"I honestly have never been more excited to have everyone hear one of my albums. I cannot wait to share it with everyone."

Evans co-wrote three of the 11 tracks. Other writers included Dave Berg (Keith Urban, Reba McEntire, Blake Shelton), Shane McAnally (Florida Georgia Line, Kasey Musgraves, Kelly Clarkson), Karyn Rochelle (Trisha Yearwood, LeAnn Rimes, Ronnie Milsap), Sarah Buxton (Keith Urban, The Band Perry, Gary Allan), and Shane Stevens (Lady Antebellum, Kellie Pickler, Montgomery Gentry).

More news for Sara Evans

CD reviews for Sara Evans

At Christmas CD review - At Christmas
Sara Evans is straight-up one of the best singers in country music, and when she performs "Go Tell It On The Mountain" backed by a supportive choir on her new holiday offering, "At Christmas," the girl is squarely in her element. She has the kind of strong voice that gives this lyric the spiritual declarative quality it requires. And yet, she can switch to the acoustic guitar-backed "Oh Come All Ye Faithful" and sing ever so prettily and quietly. »»»
Slow Me Down CD review - Slow Me Down
Once upon a time, circa 1997, Sara Evans was a dyed in the wool traditional country singer. "Three Chords and the Truth" was the most appropriate title of her debut. But times and styles have changed in the country music world. Seventeen years later, not only is Evans not traditional sounding, she also doesn't particularly heed her own advice from the title. And that means she pretty much maintains a fast, big sounding, pop approach to the 11 songs, three songs which she co-wrote. »»»
Stronger CD review - Stronger
Six years full of on and off the grid highs and lows have passed since country chanteuse Sara Evans released any new material. The artist weathered a very public divorce, performed on Dancing With the Stars, remarried and took up novel writing. Now, at what she feels is the right time, the artist is set to reveal what it's taken to make her "Stronger." It's a less traditional sound Evans' employs on "Stronger," opting instead for more of the radio-friendly pop »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Dixie Chicks age maybe even a little better – Natalie Maines, lead singer of the Dixie Chicks, joked that when she recorded Fleetwood Mac's "Landslide" 15 years ago, the line "and I'm getting older too," didn't mean as much as it does today. However, this group, which also includes Emily Robison on (mostly) banjo and Martie Maguire on fiddle, began as a bluegrass... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
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