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"Lucinda Williams" sees light of day after 10 years

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 – "Lucinda Williams," the self-titled 1988 album from the three-time Grammy Award winning singer/songwriter, will see a special 25th Anniversary reissue with bonus features on Jan. 14 via her new independent label in conjunction with Thirty Tigers.

Often referred to as "The Rough Trade" album (the UK label that originally released it), the CD has been out of print for 10 years. The new package will include a remastered version from the original master recordings, which had been missing for more than 20 years. The package will feature a bonus disc containing an unreleased 1989 live concert recorded in Eindhoven, Netherlands and six previously released live bonus tracks. The expanded booklet will include never before seen photos and two new sets of liner notes: one written by Rough Trade A&R man Robin Hurley and a second set written by U.S. music writer Chris Morris.

The bonus track listing is:

Live From Eindhoven, Netherlands - May 19, 1989
1. I Just Wanted To See You So Bad
2. Big Red Sun Blues
3. Am I Too Blue
4. Crescent City
5. The Night's Too Long
6. Something About What Happens When We Talk
7. Factory Blues
8. Happy Woman Blues
9. Abandoned
10. Wild And Blue
11. Passionate Kisses
12. Changed The Locks
13. Nothing In Rambling
14. Sundays

Additional live bonus tracks.
1. Nothing In Rambling (Live at KPFK)
2. Disgusted (Live at KPFK)
3. Side Of The Road (Live at KPFK)
4. Goin' Back Home (Live at NOISE)
5. Something About What Happens When We Talk (Live at KCRW)
6. Sundays (Live at KCRW)

"Lucinda Williams" was the artist's second album of original songs. A new studio disc is due in mid-2014.

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Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone CD review - Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone
There's little left to be said when it comes the link between quality songs and Lucinda Williams. From her early days to her commercial breakthrough with 1998's "Car Wheels On A Gravel Road," Williams has always created her own heartfelt nuggets that can be equally haunting and rocking. And this newest release is perhaps her most ambitious effort to date, a 2-disc, 20-track album, starting with the barren "Compassion" that recalls some precious combination of Linda »»»
Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release) CD review - Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release)
Relistening to Lucinda Williams' 1988 self-titled release, it's initially startling to hear how pure her voice sounds. Williams' vocal cords have taken on so much character over the years, so it's a little like listening to Joni Mitchell then and now. This remastered reissue also includes a Netherlands concert, as well as some bonus cuts. It adds up to around two hours of Williams' music and is certainly worth the time spent listening to it. Even though her voice was a »»»
Blessed CD review - Blessed
While Lucinda Williams toured recently with The Band's Levon Helm, she seems to have honed her style the last few albums so to nail her latest album. And the results are truly blessed. With producer Don Was at the helm, Williams sounds in her element on the lovely, bluesy and above all soul-saturated Buttercup. Think of a bad coda to what her nugget Essence suggested and you should get the gist of it. From there Williams is content to be in a softer, sadder side on the gorgeous, tender »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Queen Taylor wears her crown well – When Taylor Swift brought Natalie Maines of Dixie Chicks on stage to sing "Goodbye Earl," it meant more than just another star guest, on an already celebrity-packed, five-night attendance record-breaking Los Angeles concert run. This duet also brought into clear focus the truth that Swift's huge success unintentionally fulfilled the... »»»
Concert Review: Mandolin Orange commands the room – Mandolin Orange presents a simple picture: two members, sharing fiddle, mandolin and guitar and two powerful voices. As Mandolin Orange, Emily Franz and Andrew Marlin command the room. The duo formed in Carrboro, N.C. a few years back, and have released an impressive series of CDs over the last few years, most recent "Such Jubilee" on Yep Roc Records.... »»»
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