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"Lucinda Williams" sees light of day after 10 years

Tuesday, November 19, 2013 – "Lucinda Williams," the self-titled 1988 album from the three-time Grammy Award winning singer/songwriter, will see a special 25th Anniversary reissue with bonus features on Jan. 14 via her new independent label in conjunction with Thirty Tigers.

Often referred to as "The Rough Trade" album (the UK label that originally released it), the CD has been out of print for 10 years. The new package will include a remastered version from the original master recordings, which had been missing for more than 20 years. The package will feature a bonus disc containing an unreleased 1989 live concert recorded in Eindhoven, Netherlands and six previously released live bonus tracks. The expanded booklet will include never before seen photos and two new sets of liner notes: one written by Rough Trade A&R man Robin Hurley and a second set written by U.S. music writer Chris Morris.

The bonus track listing is:

Live From Eindhoven, Netherlands - May 19, 1989
1. I Just Wanted To See You So Bad
2. Big Red Sun Blues
3. Am I Too Blue
4. Crescent City
5. The Night's Too Long
6. Something About What Happens When We Talk
7. Factory Blues
8. Happy Woman Blues
9. Abandoned
10. Wild And Blue
11. Passionate Kisses
12. Changed The Locks
13. Nothing In Rambling
14. Sundays

Additional live bonus tracks.
1. Nothing In Rambling (Live at KPFK)
2. Disgusted (Live at KPFK)
3. Side Of The Road (Live at KPFK)
4. Goin' Back Home (Live at NOISE)
5. Something About What Happens When We Talk (Live at KCRW)
6. Sundays (Live at KCRW)

"Lucinda Williams" was the artist's second album of original songs. A new studio disc is due in mid-2014.

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Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone CD review - Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone
There's little left to be said when it comes the link between quality songs and Lucinda Williams. From her early days to her commercial breakthrough with 1998's "Car Wheels On A Gravel Road," Williams has always created her own heartfelt nuggets that can be equally haunting and rocking. And this newest release is perhaps her most ambitious effort to date, a 2-disc, 20-track album, starting with the barren "Compassion" that recalls some precious combination of Linda »»»
Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release) CD review - Lucinda Williams (25th Anniversary release)
Relistening to Lucinda Williams' 1988 self-titled release, it's initially startling to hear how pure her voice sounds. Williams' vocal cords have taken on so much character over the years, so it's a little like listening to Joni Mitchell then and now. This remastered reissue also includes a Netherlands concert, as well as some bonus cuts. It adds up to around two hours of Williams' music and is certainly worth the time spent listening to it. Even though her voice was a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Wishing for more McKenna – Telling friends you just saw a Lori McKenna concert usually draws immediate blank stares. That is until you mention some of the more famous songs she's helped write for stars like Little Big Town and Tim McGraw. What your friends may not realize, though, is there are more great songs where those hits came from. McKenna's set list included a... »»»
Concert Review: Drive-By Truckers finds little to celebrate – While introducing "Guns of Umpqua," off the new "American Band" album, Drive-By Truckers' Patterson Hood wondered out loud - in a profanity-laced observation - why he can never seem to see a flag not at half-mast anymore. "We can do better, people!" he admonished the crowd. In an election year with two of the most... »»»
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