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Urban takes over country chart

Thursday, November 14, 2013 – Keith Urban and Miranda Lambert took over the top of the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart for the week ending Nov. 23 with We Were Us, while the Robertson Family stayed number one on the albums chart with "Duck the Halls: A Robertson Family Christmas."

Urban dislodged Luke Bryan's That's My Kind of Night, which fell to third. Blake Shelton was second with Mine Would Be You. Taylor Swift jumped 10 spots to fourth with Red. Tim McGraw down the fifth spot with Southern Girl.

Eric Church was a big mover by far with The Outsiders skyrocketing from 26 to eighth in its fourth week out. Lady Antebellum was an even bigger chart shaker with Compass jumping from 31 to 12. Bryan debuted at 20 with Drink a Beer, his new single.

Bryan was second on the albums chart with "Crash My Party." Florida Georgia Line was third "Here's to the Good Times." Shelton was fourth, up four, with "Based on a True Story..." Kacey Musgraves jumped from 30 to fifth with "Same Trailer Different Park." Musgraves uptick presumably resulted from her winning a Country Music Association award last week for best new artist. Swift was ninth with "Red," up 10.

Little Big Town was 14th with "Tornado," up from 35. George Strait was at 21, up eight, with "Love Is Everything." Lambert was 27th with "Four the Record," up seven. McGraw was 20th with "Two Lanes of Freedom," up nine. An album by various artists, "Divided & United: The Songs of the Civil War," debuted at 32. "Merry Christmas...Love, Elvis" by Elvis Presley was at 33, up six.

Brett Eldredge stood at 36 with "Bring You Back," up seven. "Caught in the Act: Live" by Eric Church was up five to 37. Brad Paisley's "Wheelhouse" went from 54 to 38.

On the bluegrass chart, Alan Jackson was again first with "The Bluegrass Album." The Devil Makes Three was second with "I'm a Stranger Here." Steve Martin & Edie Brickell stood in third with "Love Has Come For You." Ricky Skaggs and Bruce Hornsby held fourth with "Cluck Ol' Hen: Live." The Isaacs were fifth with "The Living Years."

On the overall top 200 chart, "Duck the Halls" was third, Bryan was 11th, Florida Georgia Line was 13th, Shelton 14th and Musgraves 22nd.

More news for Keith Urban

CD reviews for Keith Urban

Ripcord CD review - Ripcord
Even though Keith Urban's single, "Wasted Time," borrows more than a little sonic sensibility from electronic music, there's still an upfront banjo solo. And this is how it's always been with Urban. He may play the part of the guitar hero at times, and even revealed his eclectic musical knowledge as a judge on American Idol, but Urban will always be a country boy at heart. And boyish good looks and talent have taken this country boy far, too. The wonderfully titled »»»
Fuse CD review - Fuse
Keith Urban will keep his superstar status intact with the lengthy "Fuse." The upbeat, commercial- and fan-friendly music and singing from Urban will ensure that. This is pretty much vintage Urban. That means Urban's not very high on the country quotient. What sounds like a guitar on the rocking Good Thing and the somewhat swampy Red Camaro, for example, is Mike Elizondo's programming. Yes, there's gango (six-stringed banjo with guitar neck) sprinkled in many songs, but »»»
Get Closer CD review - Get Closer
In a conversation with John Fogerty on CMT's "Crossroads" show, Keith Urban commented that his goal as a young man growing up was to have songs that people heard on the radio, and they would turn them up and sing along. Following that line of thinking, and the influence of catchy songwriters such as Fogerty, Urban continues to hit his mark on "Get Closer." The song quality is on par with past Urban releases; the musicianship, as is to be expected, is top notch. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Ex-Brooklyn girl MIchaela Anne makes good – Brooklyn may not exactly have been enough of a hotbed of country music for Michaela Anne. Thus, about 1- years ago, she packed up her belongings with her husband (and drummer) Aaron Shafer-Haiss and headed for Nashville. Except, they headed to East Nashville more precisely where the rep is that the cooler country cats are hanging.... »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
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