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Rogers, Nichols, Pope release new music

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 – Kenny Rogers, Joe Nichols and Cassadee Pope lead the list of new releases today.

Rogers is out with "You Can't Make Old Friends." The silver-haired singer has enjoyed a resurgence by being named to the Country Music Hall of Fame. Rogers reunited with Dolly Parton for a duet on the title track.

Nichols' "Crickets" is for a new label for him, Red Bow. He has achieved success with the hit single Sunny And 75, one of 16 songs on the disc which veers between traditional and modern country sounds.

Pope achieved fame for winning The Voice in season three. Her label debut, "Frame By Frame," has 11 song with Wasting All These Tears a hit for Pope. Dann Huff produced the disc with contributions from Nathan Chapman, Max Martin and Shellback.

Canadian singer Lindi Ortega is out with "Tin Star" on a set produced by Dave Cobb in Nashville.

More news for Kenny Rogers

CD reviews for Kenny Rogers

You Can't Make Old Friends CD review - You Can't Make Old Friends
Kenny Rogers has aged well, perhaps because he was already prematurely grey back when he first entered the country music realm more years ago than he'd probably care to mention. He sings, with the help of old friend Dolly Parton, on this album's title track about how you can't make old friends. And disarmingly honest lines like, "Who's going to tell me the truth?" raise this song above being just another music buddy number. The only trouble with having Parton sing a »»»
The Love of God CD review - The Love of God
There seems to be a theme among country superstars. They work their way onto the scene, burn bright, hopefully keeping the flame alive for some time. Then as their career ebbs and flows and the hits stop coming as steadily as they used to, they find themselves sitting in a studio recording a gospel record. Granted, country and gospel have always been fine bedfellows, but it just seems to be a trend that signifies that one is nearing the end of their career. "The Gambler" himself, Kenny »»»
Water and Bridges CD review - Water and Bridges
Kenny Rogers' first studio album in three years finds his gifts undiminished, with his voice resounding distinctively atop Dann Huff's country-tinged adult contemporary productions. The material sticks to the sort of contemplative mid-tempo numbers on which Rogers excels, and though the opening single (the power ballad "I Can't Unlove You") is lyrically pedestrian, there are songwriting riches to be found throughout. Walt Wilkins and Davis Raines' "Someone Somewhere Tonight" hits a high point »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cactus Blossoms move beyond Everlys – The Cactus Blossoms most obvious comparison is the Everly Brothers. Yes, Page Burkum and Jack Torrey are brothers, and they sure sounded like it. But only playing the Everlys card in describing The Cactus Blossoms would have sold them short. While the harmonies played a large role throughout, Torrey enjoyed a number of songs where he was the lead... »»»
Concert Review: Richey needn't chase any more – The opening lines of Kim Richey's "Chase Wild Horses," one of the best tracks on her excellent new CD, "Edgeland," starts with the lines: "I don't chase wild horses any more/I'm all done running from the way I was before Things I've done that I ain't proud of / I can't even stand the sound of I... »»»
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