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Skaggs becomes Country Hall artist in residence

Monday, October 7, 2013 – Ricky Skaggs will be the Country Music Hall of Fame 2013 Artist-in-Residence. Skaggs will present two evening performances on Nov. 18 and 19 as the artist in residence.

The concerts will be the museum's first public programs in the new CMA Theater.

Established in 2003, the museum's residency program annually honors a musician who can be credited with contributing to the canon of American popular music. Previous Artist-in-Residence honorees include Cowboy Jack Clement, Earl Scruggs, Tom T. Hall, Guy Clark, Kris Kristofferson, Jerry Douglas, Vince Gill, Buddy Miller, Connie Smith and Kenny Rogers.

This year, Skaggs has chosen to perform two shows, each with its own theme and lineup of guest artists. The Nov. 18 show will have a country music theme. Special guests include Emmylou Harris, Brad Paisley, Peter Frampton, Gordon Kennedy and The Whites. The second show, Nov. 19, will celebrate his bluegrass roots with special guests Alison Krauss, Bruce Hornsby, Martin Hayes and Dennis Cahill, Del McCoury and The Whites. Both nights will feature Skaggs' award-winning band, Kentucky Thunder.

"Ricky Skaggs has created his own career path," said Museum Director Kyle Young. "It's rare to find an artist who thrives in three different genres, but Ricky does. He is highly respected in country, bluegrass and gospel music, and he has a way of blending these styles that delights music fans. Ricky has been a great friend to the museum for many years. He was on hand, in 2011, when we announced our plans for expanding the museum. Now he will present the museum's first public program in our new CMA Theater. With its nearly 800-seat capacity, the new theater allows us to welcome more guests while still maintaining the intimate atmosphere that makes our artist-in-residence series so special."

Ticket prices for these shows range from $35-$55 per show and go on sale at noon on Friday, Oct. 18 at

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Music To My Ears CD review - Music To My Ears
Ricky Skaggs celebrated his 50th anniversary of playing music with his last album, which featured bluegrass versions of hits from his country music career. At this point, Skaggs is solidly entrenched in the bluegrass side of things, and if one counts his time with Ralph Stanley's Clinch Mountain Boys, he has probably played bluegrass longer than he did country, making this latest disc true to its title when it comes to Skaggs' fans. Traditional bluegrass played in a flawless »»»
A Skaggs Famly Christmas Volume Two CD review - A Skaggs Famly Christmas Volume Two
This second set of Skaggs Family Records Christmas songs primarily takes a traditionalist approach to celebrating the season. This is to be expected, as Ricky Skaggs' label has always remained committed to making and releasing music that might make Bill Monroe - Skaggs' onetime employer - proud. There is an even balance between new and old Christmas songs represented on this collection. There's the pretty new ballad What Songs Were Sung, which wonders out loud the tunes performed »»»
Country Hits, Bluegrass Style CD review - Country Hits,  Bluegrass Style
The musical journey of Ricky Skaggs has been a long one, from his younger days in Ralph Stanley's Clinch Mountain Boys to chart-topping success in country music during the 1980's and back to the bluegrass world on his own family-run label. That relative autonomy has allowed Skaggs to explore various themes such as gospel music and now a return of sorts to his country material. The concept here is pretty simple, and it's spelled out in the album title; all of the songs here were »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Ely wears well – Joe Ely is the prototypical rambler. It comes through in his music and in his life. There are lots of elements in the music about travels, riding the rails, small town scenery and getting away from it. In fact, after playing "I'm Gonna Strangle You Shorty" as the first song of his encore, Ely opined, "The only thing I got out of... »»»
Concert Review: With Stapleton, it's the man and his music that counts – Chris Stapleton arrived in Los Angeles still celebrating the high from recently winning three major awards at this year's CMA award ceremony. You'd never guess this by his stage presentation, however. He performed with a sparse band - a bassist, drummer, his wife singing harmonies and Mr. Stapleton handling all guitars. There was no hoopla.... »»»
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