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Pope visits mark debut

Friday, October 4, 2013 – Cassadee Pope will release her debut album, "Frame By Frame," on Republic Nashville next Tuesday. Celebrating release week, Pope will appear on multiple national television shows and perform a free show at New York City's Bryant Park.

The schedule is:

Monday: Big Morning Buzz Live with Carrie Keagan (VH-1) at 10 a.m. and Nashville's New Music In New York, Presented by Southwest Airlines, Grand Ole Opry, 'Wichcraft, NASH FM 94.7, a free concert open to the public at 6 p.m.

Tuesday: Today show at 10 a.m.
Wednesday: Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (NBC) - performing with The Roots at 12:36 a.m. eastern.

The 11-track project features the debut single Wasting All These Tears, which has sold nearly 400,000 downloads. Dann Huff produced the project with contributions from Nathan Chapman, Max Martin and Shellback.

The Season 3 winner of The Voice will offer a glimpse into life after the show, including her opening slot on Rascal Flatts' Live & Loud Tour, throughout a six-episode CMT docu-series. "Cassadee Pope: Frame by Frame" premieres tonight at 10 eastern/Pacific on the network.

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CD reviews for Cassadee Pope

Frame By Frame CD review - Frame By Frame
Cassadee Pope gained a musical foothold thanks to winning "The Voice" in 2012 under the tutelage of Blake Shelton. What impact did TV have on the Florida native? One gets the sense that the songs (five written in part by Pope) were recorded with either the stage or radio in mind. There are a lot of big sounding songs here that would translate well to either stage or the airwaves. The lead singer of pop rock band Hey Monday, Pope has a fine voice standing above the musical fray (and »»»
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