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BROX reissue first two discs

Thursday, October 3, 2013 – The Bottle Rockets are reissuing its long out-of-print, first two albums "Bottle Rockets" and "The Brooklyn Side" on Nov. 19 via Bloodshot Records.

This is the 20th anniversary of the 1993 release of the band's debut, self-titled album. announced the deluxe package's release date and are currently premiering an exclusive track from the album, a bonus cut of Indianapolis, recorded in 1991 with Brian Henneman on guitar and vocals, backed by Uncle Tupelo's Jeff Tweedy (now of Wilco) and Jay Farrar (Son Volt). The song is one of four demo takes on the reissues package, and was part of the recording that originally got The Bottle Rockets signed to their first record label (ESD) in the early 1990s.

The two discs are collected here as a remastered two-CD deluxe reissue set of the long out-of-print albums, with an additional 19 previously unreleased tracks. The package consists of a 40-page booklet detailing the band in full context of the '90s alt- scene, with editorial contributions from respected peers and fellow musicians such as Steve Earle, Patterson Hood and Lucinda Williams. Both reissued albums and bonus material were remastered under the supervision of Eric "Roscoe" Ambel.

Upcoming tour dates:
Dec. 7 - Off Broadway - St. Louis, MO +
Dec. 13 - The Hideout - Chicago, IL +
Jan. 23 - Narrows Center for the Arts Presents - Fall River, MA *
Jan. 24 - Infinity Hall - Norfolk, CT *
Jan. 25 - Iron Horse - Northampton, MA *
Jan. 26 - Tupelo Music Hall - Londonderry, NH *
Jan. 30 - Boulton Center for the Performing Arts - Bay Shore, NY *
Jan. 31 - Birchmere - Alexandria, VA *
Feb. 1 - The Newton Theatre - Newton, NJ *
Feb. 2 - Sellersville Theater - Sellersville, PA *
Feb. 4 - Ashland Coffee and Tea - Ashland, VA *
+ with Otis Gibbs
* with Marshall Crenshaw

More news for Bottle Rockets

CD reviews for Bottle Rockets

The Bottle Rockets and The Brooklyn Side (deluxe reissue) CD review - The Bottle Rockets and The Brooklyn Side (deluxe reissue)
It can safely said The Bottle Rockets were alt.-country before alt.-country was cool, and this reissue of the band's first two albums from the early '90s is proof of that. Although this extensive repackaging includes contributions from Uncle Tupelo's Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar, The Bottle Rockets never achieved the same commercial success of such acts as Drive-By Truckers and the like. And that's a shame. A song like Wave That Flag, which criticizes those that glory in the »»»
Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with the Bottle Rockets CD review - Not So Loud: An Acoustic Evening with the Bottle Rockets
Bloodshot Sooner or later, it seems, every band makes a live record. And it also seems that sooner or later, every band - or at least every electric band - unplugs for an acoustic one. After nine releases and almost two decades in the business, the Bottle Rockets have turned down the rock to kill both of those birds with the aptly-named "Not So Loud." Its acoustic element gives you re-workings and different angles on songs drawn from across the band's recording career. »»»
Lean Forward CD review - Lean Forward
It would be a mistake to think of the Bottle Rockets as a formulaic band, but the group obviously knows that the band's marriage to producer Eric Ambel is a good one. Ambel helmed the band's stellar "24 Hours a Day" disc and he's on board again here. The energy is high throughout, the best examples being Nothing but a Driver and The Way It Used to Be. But where this disc is especially strong is in the writing and the matching of instrumentation in a way that best presents the material. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Time makes a difference for Striking Matches – What a difference four months makes. When the duo Striking Matches debuted in Boston in late May, Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis capably showed off their skills, but somehow it felt like a lot of songs fell just a bit short. Davis and Zimmerman tended to cut a lot of songs abruptly, never letting them breath enough or fleshing them out.... »»»
Concert Review: Home Free sings out – Home Free, the Minnesota-based a capella quintet that first caught the nation's attention by winning the fourth season of NBC's reality competition The Sing-Off in 2013, is one of the most talented and unique acts in modern country music. The question has always been whether or not the group and their all-vocal style, which includes the... »»»
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