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Rogers streams new disc

Wednesday, October 2, 2013 – Kenny Rogers returns with his new album "You Can't Make Old Friends" on Oct. 8 via Warner. Starting this week, fans can listen free a week early through Oct. 7 on Amazon.com.

The album reunites Rogers with long-time friend and collaborator Dolly Parton for a new duet on the title track, You Can't Make Old Friends. "What a thrill it was for me to work again with my buddy, Dolly Parton, and what a special song," he said. "Working with Dolly is always a little like going home. Everything felt comfortable."

With Kyle Lehning, Warren Hartman and Dann Huff producing, the CD is Rogers' first country album since the release of "Water & Bridges" in 2006.

Songs on the CD are:
1. You Can't Make Old Friends (Duet With Dolly Parton)
2. All I Need Is One
3. You Had To Be There
4. 'Merica
5. Turn This World Around
6. Dreams Of The San Joaquin
7. Don't Leave Me In The Night Time (Featuring Buckwheat Zydeco)
8. Look At You
9. Neon Horses
10. When You Love Someone
11. It's Gonna Be Easy Now

More news for Kenny Rogers

CD reviews for Kenny Rogers

You Can't Make Old Friends CD review - You Can't Make Old Friends
Kenny Rogers has aged well, perhaps because he was already prematurely grey back when he first entered the country music realm more years ago than he'd probably care to mention. He sings, with the help of old friend Dolly Parton, on this album's title track about how you can't make old friends. And disarmingly honest lines like, "Who's going to tell me the truth?" raise this song above being just another music buddy number. The only trouble with having Parton sing a »»»
The Love of God CD review - The Love of God
There seems to be a theme among country superstars. They work their way onto the scene, burn bright, hopefully keeping the flame alive for some time. Then as their career ebbs and flows and the hits stop coming as steadily as they used to, they find themselves sitting in a studio recording a gospel record. Granted, country and gospel have always been fine bedfellows, but it just seems to be a trend that signifies that one is nearing the end of their career. "The Gambler" himself, Kenny »»»
Water and Bridges CD review - Water and Bridges
Kenny Rogers' first studio album in three years finds his gifts undiminished, with his voice resounding distinctively atop Dann Huff's country-tinged adult contemporary productions. The material sticks to the sort of contemplative mid-tempo numbers on which Rogers excels, and though the opening single (the power ballad "I Can't Unlove You") is lyrically pedestrian, there are songwriting riches to be found throughout. Walt Wilkins and Davis Raines' "Someone Somewhere Tonight" hits a high point »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
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