Sign up for newsletter
 

Lynne gives "Thanks" in November

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 – Shelby Lynne will release "Thanks," a five-song EP, on Nov. 19 through her EVERSO Records, the independent label she founded in 2010.

The EP features five new songs written and produced by Lynne.

"As a musician, these songs are a way to express my love and gratitude to the universe and to all of the music appreciating souls out there for the friendship and fellowship that music brings us...all in the name of love and sharing," she said.

"Southern blues music and gospel music go together...church raising optional," she said. "Sam Cooke, Otis Redding and James Brown came straight out of the Georgia churches...and went straight onto the charts singing the blues that came from gospel revivals across the south. Maybe it's in the water, but I feel a certain freedom when I sing spirituals. I have no certain church or religion that I have taken to. My personal relationship with my creator is personal and a personal relationship it shall remain."

Songs on the E are:
1. Call Me Up
2. Forevermore
3. Walkin'
4. This Road I'm On
5. Thanks

Lynne recorded "Thanks" at EVERSO Studio in Palm Desert, Cal. with co-producer Ben Peeler, who also played lap steel and guitars and contributed background vocals. In addition, the EP features Maxine Waters on piano and vocals, Michael Jerome on drums/percussion and Ed Maxwell on upright and electric bass, Wurlitzer, Moog and background vocals.

"Thanks" follows 2011's "Revelation Road."

More news for Shelby Lynne

CD reviews for Shelby Lynne

I Can't Imagine CD review - I Can't Imagine
Shelby Lynne really needs to figure out who she is if she ever wants to be something more than the answer to the trivia question "What artist won a Grammy for best new artist after releasing 6 albums over 12 years?" Is she a country singer? Blues? Is she Dusty Springfield reincarnated? Why can't she find a style and stick with it?" That's what they say anyway, but maybe they're wrong. Maybe Shelby figured out a long time ago who she was and how she wanted to sing. »»»
I Am Shelby Lynne (Deluxe Version) CD review - I Am Shelby Lynne (Deluxe Version)
The ironies surrounding Shelby Lynne's sixth album, 1999's "I Am Shelby Lynne," were as thick as mutant kudzu at the time. After a quintet of albums that garnered Lynne a ton of peer respect and negligible sales, the singer/songwriter extricated herself from a Nashville star machine that seemed determined to sculpt her talent in its witless image. Lynne moved to California, reinvented herself as herself, enlisted the talents of producer Bill Bottrell »»»
Revelatiom Road Deluxe Edition
It's been 14 years since Shelby Lynne released her soulful, country-tinged album "I Am Shelby Lynne." And over the course of that time, Lynne has had her share of ups and a few creative downs. However on this latest (reissued here with bonus tracks, a live club recording and a second live disc from London plus a DVD about the making the disc), Lynne tends to go into another soulful but equally roots-y realm on the opening title track. It's not a surprise she taps into this »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

Lonely Heartstring Band navigates "Deep Waters" Four years after forming in Boston and a year after receiving their first major award (an IBMA Momentum nod), when most bands might be expected to have two or three already in circulation, the Lonely Heartstring Band finally has its first full-length CD release "Deep Waters" (Rounder) out on the street.... »»»
Bush tells the story Sam Bush is back with a new record, "Storyman," not that he ever went anywhere. Identified with The Telluride Bluegrass Festival, which he has played in one form or another for each year but one, he helped define the new grass sound. Starting with Poor Richard's Almanac (along with Alan Munde and Wayne Stewart) in 1970, continuing to turns with New Grass Revival and Nash Ramblers, Bush has played fiddle, mandolin and mandolin variants (including slide mandolin) solidly since that time.... »»»
Ladies and gentlemen, The Infamous Stringdusters Nearly 10 years on, The Infamous Stringdusters have carved out a singular place for themselves in the bluegrass/jamgrass world. The Stringdusters tour aggressively, are fixtures on the festival circuit and released several intriguing recording projects since late 2015: an EP of covers, including Tom Petty's "American Girl," and a full-length album of songs collaborating with some of the finest female singers in the Americana genre ("Ladies and Gentlemen").... »»»
The Fighter CD review - The Fighter
A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout. Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record... »»»
We're All Somebody From Somewhere CD review - We're All Somebody From Somewhere
It's a difficult proposition for a band member to go solo after a longstanding highly successful career and try to forge a musical identity that not only isn't all that similar to what's come before, but is also able to stand on its own as musically viable. And despite some false starts in launching his solo career commercially on the country charts, Steven Tyler has managed to make a statement on both counts. »»»
Rattle & Roar CD review - Rattle & Roar
In the spirit of "if it was a good idea the first time around, it's got to be worth trying again," Jerry Douglas and his collaborators in the Earls Of Leicester return with a follow-up to their self-titled Grammy-winning debut of two years ago. On the off chance that you missed it the first time around, Douglas pulled the band together, not as just another "tribute" band... »»»
Young in All the Wrong Ways CD review - Young in All the Wrong Ways
Sara Watkins' voice is powerful. "Young In All The Wrong Ways" showcases her instrument admirably. Watkins burst upon the music scene in 1989, as part of Nickel Creek, teaming with her brother Sean and mandolinist Chris Thile. Nickel Creek had a solid run of recording and live music performances for a couple of decades before the members spread out into other collaborations. »»»