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Lynne gives "Thanks" in November

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 – Shelby Lynne will release "Thanks," a five-song EP, on Nov. 19 through her EVERSO Records, the independent label she founded in 2010.

The EP features five new songs written and produced by Lynne.

"As a musician, these songs are a way to express my love and gratitude to the universe and to all of the music appreciating souls out there for the friendship and fellowship that music brings us...all in the name of love and sharing," she said.

"Southern blues music and gospel music go together...church raising optional," she said. "Sam Cooke, Otis Redding and James Brown came straight out of the Georgia churches...and went straight onto the charts singing the blues that came from gospel revivals across the south. Maybe it's in the water, but I feel a certain freedom when I sing spirituals. I have no certain church or religion that I have taken to. My personal relationship with my creator is personal and a personal relationship it shall remain."

Songs on the E are:
1. Call Me Up
2. Forevermore
3. Walkin'
4. This Road I'm On
5. Thanks

Lynne recorded "Thanks" at EVERSO Studio in Palm Desert, Cal. with co-producer Ben Peeler, who also played lap steel and guitars and contributed background vocals. In addition, the EP features Maxine Waters on piano and vocals, Michael Jerome on drums/percussion and Ed Maxwell on upright and electric bass, Wurlitzer, Moog and background vocals.

"Thanks" follows 2011's "Revelation Road."

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