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Moore tops country chart, second in U.S.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 – Justin Moore debuts at number two as the second best selling CD in the U.S. this past week with "Off the Beaten Path."

Moore sold 96,730 copies of his third CD. This marks the second time the Arkansas native tops the country album chart.

Jack Johnson topped the overall chart with "From Here to Now to You" with 117,000 sold for his fourth number one.

"Man, it's been a mind-blowing week having my fourth number one single and now the number one c album with 'Off the Beaten Path.' It's unreal," said Moore. "I can't say it enough...thanks to Country radio and our are the best, and we couldn't do this without you. Hope to see you on the road soon."

Producer Jeremy Stover helmed the 16-track project, which features duets with Miranda Lambert on Old Habits and Charlie Daniels on the redneck anthem For Some Ol Redneck Reason. Moore also teamed up with Stover to pen several songs for the project, including the ode to famous booties (Kim Kardashian and JLo) on I'd Want It To Be Yours.

Moore heads out on the 57-city Off the Beaten Path Tour starting Nov. 1 in Springfield, Mo. The headline dates will continue throughout the spring and feature Randy Houser and special guest Josh Thompson.

Joining Moore were Chris Young ("A.M." at number 3) and Billy Currington ("We Are Tonight" at 10), along with Luke Bryan ("Crash My Party," at six in its sixth week with 47,000; down 11 per cent) and Keith Urban ("Fuse," falling from first to eighth in its second week with 31,000; down 69 per cent).

Young sold 53,000 units, becoming his highest-charting album, although not his best sales week. This is Young's second top 10 effort, following 2011's "Neon," which was his biggest sales week, starting at 73,000.

Currington, meanwhile, scored his second top 10 album, as "We Are Tonight" selling 26,000 units. That's far less than 2010's "Enjoy Yourself" with 45,000 units.

More news for Justin Moore

CD reviews for Justin Moore

Off the Beaten Path CD review - Off the Beaten Path
With Justin Moore's Off The Beaten Path, this stereotypical modern day country singer actually treads a well trod mainstream road, where the songs push all the right buttons, much like that famous Pavlovian dog study. Moore predictably sings about country life, including rednecks (For Some Ol' Redneck Reason), small towns (This Kind Of Town) and listening to the radio with your girl (Country Radio). Country artists like Moore are so adamant about keeping it real, but you'd almost »»»
Outlaws Like Me CD review - Outlaws Like Me
Justin Moore's sophomore release sounds like the product of a marketing campaign aimed at good ol' country boys who like to drink, drive pickups and party with scantily clad country girls. The recent success of similar artists like Eric Church and Josh Thompson shows that there is a market for Nashville country that is decidedly less pop focused than many recent artists. The album feels too cliché to ring true. The problem begins on the first song, Redneck Side, an upbeat »»»
Justin Moore CD review - Justin Moore
There are a lot of male singers out there today in country covering the same turf - Jason Aldean, Randy Houser and now Justin Moore among others. Their music may be steeped in country at some level, but the direction that they follow is far more rooted in rock. Arkansas native Moore has a few quality songs among the 10, but he never succeeds in carving out his own niche. Moore falls victim to the host of other would be country poseurs who try to invoke the names of the forefathers in the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Corb Lund finally returns – To say that a Corb Lund show was a rarity in these parts would be an understatement, but with a new disc, "Things That Can't Be Undone," dropping in two days, the Canadian roots/country artist is on the road - south of the border. Lund lives on a farm in southern Alberta, Canada, near the Montana border, and has achieved popularity in his homeland.... »»»
Concert Review: Time makes a difference for Striking Matches – What a difference four months makes. When the duo Striking Matches debuted in Boston in late May, Sarah Zimmerman and Justin Davis capably showed off their skills, but somehow it felt like a lot of songs fell just a bit short. Davis and Zimmerman tended to cut a lot of songs abruptly, never letting them breath enough or fleshing them out.... »»»
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