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Urban leads charts with "Fuse"

Tuesday, September 17, 2013 – Keith Urban lit up the cash register because "Fuse" is the best selling disc in the U.S. Urban edged out the Weeknd's "Kiss Land."

Urban sold 98,000 units of his disc, 3,000 more than the Weeknd.

Urban's sales no doubt were helped by performances on the Today show, The View and Late Show with David Letterman.

Despite leading the charts, the numbers were far less than his last disc, "Get Closer" in 2010. That release started with 162,000 units sold. In fact, the numbers were the worst for Urban since "Golden Road" in 2002 sold 67,000 units.

Luke Bryan was fourth with "Crash My Party," selling 53,000 units, down 22 percent.

Sheryl Crow debuted at seven with "Feels Like Home," her first country disc. Crow sold 36,000 units.

The charts will officially out on Thursday.

More news for Keith Urban

CD reviews for Keith Urban

Fuse CD review - Fuse
Keith Urban will keep his superstar status intact with the lengthy "Fuse." The upbeat, commercial- and fan-friendly music and singing from Urban will ensure that. This is pretty much vintage Urban. That means Urban's not very high on the country quotient. What sounds like a guitar on the rocking Good Thing and the somewhat swampy Red Camaro, for example, is Mike Elizondo's programming. Yes, there's gango (six-stringed banjo with guitar neck) sprinkled in many songs, but »»»
Get Closer CD review - Get Closer
In a conversation with John Fogerty on CMT's "Crossroads" show, Keith Urban commented that his goal as a young man growing up was to have songs that people heard on the radio, and they would turn them up and sing along. Following that line of thinking, and the influence of catchy songwriters such as Fogerty, Urban continues to hit his mark on "Get Closer." The song quality is on par with past Urban releases; the musicianship, as is to be expected, is top notch. »»»
Defying Gravity CD review - Defying Gravity
Keith Urban's 2006 album, "Love, Pain & The Whole Crazy Thing" seemed to mirror his life in all its tabloid-baiting chaos, and you can only hope that 2009's "Defying Gravity" does the same. If this album is an indication, Urban has clearly put that chaos behind him, replacing it with the love and joy that comes from marriage and a new daughter. The 11 songs dance along, driven by joyful rhythms and guitar hooks. Even the one song that starts off like a kiss-off, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Fogerty lives up to his past – Once upon a time, John Fogerty eschewed any association with the band that made him famous, Creedence Clearwater Revival. But time, which changed a long time ago, heals everything apparently. Not only is Fogerty playing CCR songs, he makes those overwhelmingly the cornerstone of his very fine, invigorating night of music that were the soundtracks of... »»»
Concert Review: With Turnpike Troubadors, there's lots of good reason – The appearance of Turnpike Troubadours was a bit curious. The Oklahoma Red Dirt music troupe has not released an album since 2012's "Goodbye Normal Street." So, it's not as if they're pushing new product. They also had never even played Boston before. In fact, lead singer Evan Felker said he had never set foot in Beantown period.... »»»
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