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Moore heads home

Monday, September 16, 2013 – Justin Moore headed home to Arkansas over the weekend to kickoff the release of his third studio album,"Off the Beaten Path," which hits stores tomorrow.

Celebrating the new project, Moore performed at The University of Arkansas before heading to off for fishing and campfire singing.

More than 7,000 fellow Razorback fans joined Moorefor a free concert at the University of Arkansas on Friday. The crowd was treated hits, tunes from the new album and a special dance routine from The University of Arkansas Pom Squad for his Top 5-and-climbing hit Point At You. The show also served as a pep rally of sorts, for Saturday's game against Southern Mississippi. As a special guest, Moore joined Coach Brad Bielema and the Razorbacks for the Hog Walk, welcoming the team into the stadium.

Moore heads to New York tomorrow for additional media visits and a performance at the Best Buy Theater on Friday.

More news for Justin Moore

CD reviews for Justin Moore

Off the Beaten Path CD review - Off the Beaten Path
With Justin Moore's Off The Beaten Path, this stereotypical modern day country singer actually treads a well trod mainstream road, where the songs push all the right buttons, much like that famous Pavlovian dog study. Moore predictably sings about country life, including rednecks (For Some Ol' Redneck Reason), small towns (This Kind Of Town) and listening to the radio with your girl (Country Radio). Country artists like Moore are so adamant about keeping it real, but you'd almost »»»
Outlaws Like Me CD review - Outlaws Like Me
Justin Moore's sophomore release sounds like the product of a marketing campaign aimed at good ol' country boys who like to drink, drive pickups and party with scantily clad country girls. The recent success of similar artists like Eric Church and Josh Thompson shows that there is a market for Nashville country that is decidedly less pop focused than many recent artists. The album feels too cliché to ring true. The problem begins on the first song, Redneck Side, an upbeat »»»
Justin Moore CD review - Justin Moore
There are a lot of male singers out there today in country covering the same turf - Jason Aldean, Randy Houser and now Justin Moore among others. Their music may be steeped in country at some level, but the direction that they follow is far more rooted in rock. Arkansas native Moore has a few quality songs among the 10, but he never succeeds in carving out his own niche. Moore falls victim to the host of other would be country poseurs who try to invoke the names of the forefathers in the »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Trampled by Turtles leads stellar night – The animals ruled, for the most part, led by Trampled by Turtles, in a superb trifecta of music long on musicianship and quality songs. Trampled by Turtles, who headlined the sterling bill that also included Elephant Revival and Hurray for the Riff Raff (not animalistic unless the "riff raff" act that way), are going through some major sonic changes.... »»»
Concert Review: Goodnight, Texas gets on the map – Goodnight, Texas is a town with a small population - 28 according to the band's web site. So, if anything is going to put the unincorporated dot on the map, it may be the bi-coastal country band that stole the name. Avi Vinocur, who dwells in San Francisco, and Patrick Dyer Wolf, of North Carolina, are the mainstays of the band with them... »»»
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