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Cowboy Jack Clement passes away

Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Country Music Hall of Fame inductee-elect "Cowboy" Jack Clement passed away at his home in Nashville after a battle with cancer today at 82.

The Memphis native began his career in 1956 as a producer and engineer for Sam Phillips at Sun Records, working with Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. Clement was the person who discovered and recorded Jerry Lee Lewis while Phillips was away on a trip to Florida.

Clement produced Johnny Cash's Ring of Fire. Clement wrote the song Ballad of a Teenage Queen in 1957, and that became a crossover hit for Cash. Other Cash hits penned by Clement included Guess Things Happen That Way, a chart topper on the country charts and 11 on the pop charges in 1958. He also wrote The One on the Right Is on the Left a number two country hit in 1966.

He also achieved success as a songwriter with Dolly Parton, Ray Charles, Elvis Presley, Charlie Pride and Tom Jones recording his songs. Clement produced albums by Waylon Jennings and Townes Van Zandt.

In 1987, Clement was approached by U2 to record at Sun Studio in Memphis. Clement wasn't aware of U2, but took the gig and was on "Rattle and Hum."

Clement is slated to be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame later this year. Services are pending.

More news for Cowboy Jack Clement

CD reviews for Cowboy Jack Clement

For Once and For All CD review - For Once and For All
Cowboy Jack Clement's impact on the roots of rock 'n' roll and country music ought not be underestimated. After all, he was there at the beginning, serving as a producer and engineer for Sam Phillips at Sun Records, guiding the careers of its stable of stars in the persons of Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and Johnny Cash, and discovering the as-yet unknown Jerry Lee Lewis. He subsequently penned much of Cash's early hit repertoire, songs that included "Ballad of a Teenage »»»
Guess Things Happen That Way
Although not in the same league vocally as past associates Johnny Cash, Charley Pride, Waylon Jennings and Don Williams, 73 year-old producer/songwriter Jack Clement one-ups most of them on the score of imaginative song selection and simple evocative production chops. Clement's vocals are sometimes craggy and pitchy, yet his melodic old-timey baritone often proves charming. This is especially true of the absurdly humorous polka-tinged "Drinking Carrot Juice" and scatting Dixieland of "Leavin' Is »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Earle does it well all over again – Justin Townes Earle is back. Not that he had gone anywhere too far away. Less than four months ago, he performed a similarly styled solo acoustic show across the river in Boston at the City Winery. So, once again, this was the chance for Earle to showcase his bevy of very good material, leaning heavily towards a bluesy side, with his interest in... »»»
Concert Review: Stuart turns up the honky tonk – Late in the afternoon before heading up to Penn's Peak, news broke that the venue was nominated by The Academy of Country Music as one of the top five small venues for 2018. This foreshadowed a special vibe for Marty Stuart and His Fabulous Superlatives on this night, playing for about 1,000 fans. The band, together now for 16 years, bedecked in... »»»
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