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Court Yard Hounds return

Tuesday, July 16, 2013 – The Court Yard Hounds - the duo of Dixie Chicks and sisters Emily Robison and Martie Maguire - release its second disc, "Amelita." The duo had a hand in writing almost all of the songs and they produced the disc along with Jim Scott, who worked with the Chicks. The songs tend to veer towards a California, sunny pop sound. Robison assumes most of the vocals with Maguire having lead vocals on two songs. This is the Hounds' first disc since its 2010 debut.

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CD reviews for Court Yard Hounds

Amelita CD review - Amelita
With The Dixie Chicks seemingly on recording hiatus, this has been a productive year for the trio in other configurations. For sisters Emily Robison and Martie Maguire, that translates into the second volume of the California sunshine pop sounds under the moniker The Court Yard Hounds three years after its debut. And once again, Maguire and Robison know a thing or two about sisterly harmonies, bright sounding songs and a few twists and turns. This isn't a straight-ahead country disc »»»
Court Yard Hounds CD review - Court Yard Hounds
With their main gig - the Dixie Chicks - on an extended recording hiatus, sisters Emily Robison and Martie Maguire decided to get together to form this duo and put out some quality music. Think of Sheryl Crow, and you have a pretty good idea of what the Court Yard Hounds sound like. There is a brightness from the generally simple, laid-back production of the sisters and Jim Scott. The Hounds' sound is not something you'd find on a Chicks' disc. The material comes as being more of »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Outlaw lives up to his name – If you're a country singer, and you use the name Outlaw as your last name, well, you'd better back it up. Los Angeles-based traditional honky tonker Sam Outlaw set the record straight, though, saying he was "going to confront it head on." He told the crowd of 45 at his Boston-area debut that he took his mom's maiden name at his stage name.... »»»
Concert Review: White follows his muse – John Paul White said he was unsure how many would bother showing up on this night. He expressed uncertainty even how big a crowd he would attract in his hometown of Florence, Ala. when this tour started a few weeks earlier. Perhaps White should not have been surprised. After all, he was one-half of the great late The Civil Wars, who turned in a... »»»
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