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Travis remains critical

Friday, July 12, 2013 – Randy Travis is under "heavy sedation" following surgery on Wednesday after suffering a stroke.

Baylor issued a statement, issued late today, said Travis "is resting comfortably," but remains in critical condition.

"His family continues to ask for prayers and support," the statement.

Travis, 54, suffered a stroke and underwent surgery Wednesday night at The Heart Hospital Baylor in Plano, Texas.

Travis has received much support from the country community.

More news for Randy Travis

CD reviews for Randy Travis

Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am CD review - Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am
Not having heard Randy Travis' new material, one could mistakenly think a guest vocalist was taking the first licks of "I'm Movin' On," his new album's opening cut. Is that Hank Snow? No, can't be. Refrain ... still the same voice. Second verse - oh man, that's Randy Travis! Wow, his voice sure has changed. Well, yeah, when you've been singing professionally since the mid-1980s, the ol' pipes can slip a bit. And Travis, 54, has battled serious »»»
Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am CD review - Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am
Randy Travis hasn't had it easy in recent years with abuse, arrests and this past summer, a major health issue of a stroke. But one thing that hasn't changed is the ease with which the North Carolina native, credited with spearheading the Neo Traditionalist movement 25 years ago, tackles traditional material. That's what this disc is about - Travis doing his take on songs that influenced him. From the sounds of it, Travis had a lot of good music kicking around the house, especially Merle Haggard. »»»
Anniversary Celebration CD review - Anniversary Celebration
When Randy Travis released "A Few Ole Country Boys" in 1990, it was plain to see the message of his duet with (and ode to) the legendary George Jones hit close to home. Just a few years removed from his stint as a cook at Music City bar The Nashville Palace, Travis' delivery of lyrics such as "Not too many years ago/When dreams weren't comin' true/I'd reach for inspiration/Sometimes it would be you" carried heavy-hitting meaning by the budding star. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
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