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After MidNight names Aldean, Bryan, Underwood, Lady A, Owen as hosts

Thursday, July 11, 2013 – Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan, Lady Antebellum, Jake Owen and Carrie Underwood will be the first of 20 artists to take over the After MidNite show after Blair Garner steps down July 31.

Garner is a DJ at Nash FM in New York.

The takeover, which runs from Aug. 1 through the end of 2013 will also feature special performances and interviews.

Underwood will host Aug. 1-2; Aldean the week of Aug. 5; Bryan the week of Aug. 12; Lady Antebellum's Charles Kelley and Dave Haywood the week of Aug. 19 and Jake Owen the week of Aug. 26.

"Premiere Networks has had a successful relationship with Blair Garner for many years and we wish him all the best with his new program," stated Jennifer Leimgruber, Premiere Networks Executive Vice President of Music Programming. "We look forward to announcing a new host for After MidNite in the near future. In the meantime, we're excited to welcome the biggest stars in country music as they put their stamp on After MidNite and help us celebrate this special milestone."

"After MidNite was just my little dream," Garner said. "Now some 20 years later, I'm so proud of what Premiere and I have accomplished. Premiere has been so gracious as I've pursued my new dreams of hosting mornings on Nash FM in NYC. It proves that even in the most competitive environments, two giant companies can work together to make big things happen. I'm so thankful to [Cumulus'] John Dickey and [Premiere's] Julie Talbott for bending over backwards for me through my transition to a morning host. Good people do good things. After MidNite was a wonderful chapter for me. But what lies ahead is the meat of the book, and I'm so glad that my partner in this new chapter is Cumulus. Congratulations to everyone involved."

On Nov. 13, 1993, After MidNite aired for the first time on 12 stations. Within 4 months, more than 100 affiliates were on board. The show is nationally syndicated by Premiere Networks and can be heard on more than 230 affiliates by 2.7 million weekly listeners.

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Jason Aldean is getting used to the view from the top. His last album "My Kinda Party" spawned 5 Top 10 singles and has charted for almost 2 years. Driven by rocking country coupled with rap and a power ballad, that album seemed to rise to the top of the charts organically. With his fifth release, "Night Train," he seems to be taking dead aim at the summit. Aldean is at his best as a studly outlaw, but the majority of the material on "Night Train" is clichéd »»»
My Kinda Party CD review - My Kinda Party
Jason Aldean covers plenty of familiar ground in his latest offering, moving with ease from tanned-leg Georgia dreams to square cornfields to a fairly even mix of church pews and bar stools. If anything, the album is a bit too seamless, one song melding into the next, the words on many evaporating into thin air. But it all adds up to a very good time - exactly what you'd hope for with an album with "party" in its title. Don't Wanna Stay , a duet with Kelly Clarkson (of all »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Cadillac Three, Sellers do it their own way – The way The Cadillac Three lead singer Jaren Johnston told it, the band could have had their choice of opening tours this year for the likes of Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley and Jake Owen. No go though because the long-haired singer fronting the rough-and-most-definitely ready trio said the band wanted to do it their own way. Based on this most... »»»
Concert Review: Great songs, not glitz, highlight Lynn tribute – An eclectic group of Americana artists gathered together for a relatively low-key tribute to Loretta Lynn on the eve of the glitzy Grammy Awards. In contrast to the expensive dresses and song sets displayed at Staples Center for the awards show TV broadcast, these performers were backed by a skillful traditional country music house band.... »»»
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