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Travis improves

Wednesday, July 10, 2013 – Randy Travis was transferred to a specialized heart center for further treatment for a heart condition, his doctors said today.

Travis was admitted through an emergency department to Baylor Medical Center at McKinney on Sunday. "He had been in previously excellent health until three weeks prior when he developed a viral upper respiratory illness," said Dr. William Gray, the director of cardiovascular services at Baylor Medical Center at McKinney.

Travis was admitted with a presumptive cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. He was stabilized and subsequently sent to THE HEART HOSPITAL Baylor Plano for a higher level of specialized care in the care of Dr. Michael Mack, according to a statement.

"We determined together in a joint decision, that a higher level of specialized care was appropriate and therefore we transferred him to THE HEART HOSPITAL Baylor Plano," said Mack, the director of cardiovascular disease at the Baylor Health Care System in Dallas. "Since his transfer, his condition has stabilized, and he has shown signs of improvement. "

"On behalf of his Mr. Travis' family, friends and associates, we would like to express our extreme gratitude for the overwhelming affection and support that Mr. Travis has received," he said. "We will be giving further updates as his condition changes."

More news for Randy Travis

CD reviews for Randy Travis

Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am CD review - Influence Vol. 2: The Man I Am
Not having heard Randy Travis' new material, one could mistakenly think a guest vocalist was taking the first licks of "I'm Movin' On," his new album's opening cut. Is that Hank Snow? No, can't be. Refrain ... still the same voice. Second verse - oh man, that's Randy Travis! Wow, his voice sure has changed. Well, yeah, when you've been singing professionally since the mid-1980s, the ol' pipes can slip a bit. And Travis, 54, has battled serious »»»
Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am CD review - Influence Vol. 1: The Man I Am
Randy Travis hasn't had it easy in recent years with abuse, arrests and this past summer, a major health issue of a stroke. But one thing that hasn't changed is the ease with which the North Carolina native, credited with spearheading the Neo Traditionalist movement 25 years ago, tackles traditional material. That's what this disc is about - Travis doing his take on songs that influenced him. From the sounds of it, Travis had a lot of good music kicking around the house, especially Merle Haggard. »»»
Anniversary Celebration CD review - Anniversary Celebration
When Randy Travis released "A Few Ole Country Boys" in 1990, it was plain to see the message of his duet with (and ode to) the legendary George Jones hit close to home. Just a few years removed from his stint as a cook at Music City bar The Nashville Palace, Travis' delivery of lyrics such as "Not too many years ago/When dreams weren't comin' true/I'd reach for inspiration/Sometimes it would be you" carried heavy-hitting meaning by the budding star. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Making perfect sense of Striking Matches, The Secret Sisters – The pairing of Striking Matches and The Secret Sisters on tour makes perfect sense. Both are duos, although the Matches are male/female and the Secrets truly are sisters (Rogers is the name, not Secret). Both emphasize keen vocal interplay. And perhaps most importantly, they shared a very famous producer, T Bone Burnett. But when it came to the live... »»»
Concert Review: Whitehorse changes gears – Whitehorse, the Canadian husband-and-wife duo of Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet, has changed gears. In years past, they were more on the roots side, but you would have scratched your head wondering where that went during their show at what is billed as a folk club. Only Whitehorse couldn't be accused of being folk oriented either in a tour... »»»
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