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Tritt resurfaces, The Deadly Gentlmen debut, Murphey mixes it up

Tuesday, July 9, 2013 – Travis Tritt returns with his first disc in six years, sort of. "The Calm After..." is out today on his own label. The disc actually is a reissue of his 2007 disc, "The Storm," which embroiled the Georgia singer in a protracted lawsuit with his label Category 5. The label went under thanks to a cloud of legal issues surrounding its owner, who eventually went to jail. The disc contains two new songs, including one with his daughter, Tyler Reese, 15, who sing the Patty Smyth/Don Henley hit Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough.

Veteran Michael Martin Murphey also releases an album, "Red River Drifter," on his own label. The music is varied including country and blues.

Boston-based quintet The Deadly Gentlemen make its Rounder debut with "Roll Me, Tumble Me." The disc, its third overall, contains 10 songs from a band including Greg Liesz on banjo, Sam Grisman on bass, mandolinist Dominick Leslie, fiddle player Mike Barnett and guitarist Stash Wyslouch.

CD reviews for The Deadly Gentlemen

Roll Me, Tumble Me CD review - Roll Me, Tumble Me
With their third release, the Boston-based the Deadly Gentlemen deliver a mix of bluegrass, folk, pop and rock. Banjoist Greg Liszt (formerly of Crooked Still and Bruce Springsteen's touring band) wrote all 10 songs for the project, including re-workings of some past compositions. Though not as overtly comical as the Austin Lounge Lizards much of Liszt's writing is humorous, including the title track (previously recorded for their 2008 album "The Bastard Masterpiece") »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: White follows his muse – John Paul White said he was unsure how many would bother showing up on this night. He expressed uncertainty even how big a crowd he would attract in his hometown of Florence, Ala. when this tour started a few weeks earlier. Perhaps White should not have been surprised. After all, he was one-half of the great late The Civil Wars, who turned in a... »»»
Concert Review: Parton rings true – Dolly Parton may be a brand - sometimes corny jokes about her chest, her blonde wig, rhinestone outfits, hillbilly trash image. But that would be cutting Parton way short because on her first full-scale tour in 25 years, the Tennessee mountain girl retained her lovely singing abilities, story telling and plethora of material from very old to not even released yet.... »»»
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