Sign up for newsletter
 

Jarosz builds up to new album

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 – Sarah Jarosz will release "Build Me Up From Bones," the third release from the 22-year-old artist on Oct. 1 via Sugar Hill Records.

"Build Me Up From Bones" was recorded in the midst of Jarosz's final semester at the New England Conservatory where she graduated with honors and touring. Following her mid-May graduation, she flew straight to Nashville to put the finishing touches on the album.

The Texas native penned 9 of 11 tracks, and while Jarosz previously tended to write and sing in third person narratives, her new material connects in a much more personal way. She also covers Joanna Newsom's Book of Right-On and Bob Dylan's Simple Twist of Fate.

Gary Paczosa co-produced the disc. The recording included Alex Hargreaves (fiddle) and Nathaniel Smith (cello) with whom Jarosz has been touring with since 2010. As the recording progressed, other guests were added, including Dan Dugmore, Darrell Scott and Chris Thile.

Upcoming tour dates are:
June 21-22 - Telluride, CO - Michael D. Palm Theatre
July 6 - Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival
July 7- Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival
July 11 - Tupelo, MS - Down on Main Street
July 13 - Louisville, KY - Forecastle Festival
July 18 - Missoula, MT - Top Hat Lounge
July 20 - Alta, WY - Targhee Fest
July 25 - Northampton, MA - Iron Horse Music Hall
July 26 - Hiram, ME - Ossipee Valley Music Festival 7-27- Newport, RI - Newport Folk Festival
July 28 - Ogunquit, ME - Jonathan's Restaurant
Aug. 10 - Portland, OR - Oregon Zoo Amphitheatre 8-11 - Seattle, WA - Woodland Park Zoo Amphitheatre
Sept. 7 - Charlottesville, VA - Monticello
Sept. 20 - North Adams, MA - Fresh Grass Festival
Sept. 28 - Hamilton, OH - Parrish Auditorium
Oct. 10 - Ann Arbor, MI - The Ark
Oct. 12 - Stoughton, WI - Stoughton Opera House
Oct. 20 - Johnson City, TN - Mountain Stage D.P. Culp University Center
Nov. 7 - Austin, TX - Paramount Theatre (with the Milk Carton Kids)
Nov. 9 - Fischer, TX - Rice Festival

More news for Sarah Jarosz

CD reviews for Sarah Jarosz

Undercurrent CD review - Undercurrent
No longer just a startlingly talented young bluegrass musician, on her latest, Sarah Jarosz shows her growth both as a person and an artist. This is her first recording done while she wasn't in either high school or college, the first since her move to New York City three years ago, and the first time she has included only new original material. It may be the middle one of those firsts that had the most influence on the end results; there is little to no traditional bluegrass material here »»»
Build Me Up From Bones CD review - Build Me Up From Bones
Aging has worked wonders for Sarah Jarosz because she sounds better and better with each release. On her third disc, the Texas native, who occupies a musical turf straddling bluegrass, country and acoustic music, Jarosz proves to be more confident than ever in her vocal delivery. There's some bite in Fuel the Fire with a lot of banjo, courtesy of Jarosz herself, plucking going on all around here. Jarosz shines on the pared down, low key take on Dylan's Simple Twist of Fate with a »»»
Follow Me Down CD review - Follow Me Down
For those of us who have been around long enough to remember browsing through long racks of LPs at the local record store (remember them?), one of the oldest tricks in evaluating an album from a new, unknown artist is to scan the liner notes to see who the sidemen are - the principle being, you can judge an artist by the company he or she keeps. In the CD age, that's not always possible since the credits are often shrink-wrapped away on the inside, but in the case of Sarah Jarosz, it's a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hurray for the Riff Raff changes - in some ways – Hurray for the Riff Raff's new release, "The Navigator," was a long time coming - slightly more than three years after "Small Town Heroes," a strong roots-disc that found them touring incessantly. A few things have changed in the interim for the New Orleans-based band, but one of them remains the presence of front woman Alynda Lee Segarra.... »»»
Concert Review: Nightflyer soars – Despite the stage being a touch small for a five-piece band, the highly entertaining and extremely talented Nightflyer delivered with that hard driving, high-energy country bluegrass sound fans have come to expect. Joking that their contract only allowed them to play songs about trains, prison, whiskey, mama and Jesus, Nightflyer's diversity... »»»
Subscribe to Country News Digest Country News Digest      Follow Country Standard Time on twitter CST      Visit Country Standard Time on Facebook CST

Elsewhere in the news

Currently at the CST blogs

The Avett Brothers come home to MerleFest For The Avett Brothers, MerleFest is a coming home of sorts. This year's edition of the MerleFest "traditional-plus" music festival in Wilkesboro, N.C., the event's 30th anniversary, a milestone sure to be marked by many different special appearances and commemorations during the festival's four-day run, is no exception.... »»»
Gibson Brothers rise up from "In the Ground" There's no more solid live bluegrass show than the Gibson Brothers. They play with great technical skill and crispness. Their harmonies are just what a brother act should be: sweet, true and never forced. Brothers Leigh and Eric Gibson surround themselves with outstanding sidemen with impeccable bluegrass cred: Jesse Brock (mandolin), Mike Barber (bass) and Clayton Campbell on fiddle.... »»»
The Devil Makes Three examine salvation, sin For nearly a decade and a half, The Devil Makes Three has concocted an amazing blend of bluegrass, folk, country, blues, rockabilly and whatever happens to bubble to the surface, and applied it liberally to their songwriting ethic.... »»»
The Harmed Brothers CD review - The Harmed Brothers
Let's put it succinctly. The Harmed Brothers may be the best band no one has ever heard of. Well, maybe that's an exaggeration. They do have their ardent admirers, so let's not discount their following entirely. Still, for those who are unaware, the band's new eponymous effort ought to make it clear that this is a group with a wealth of resources at their command. »»»
West Coast Town CD review - West Coast Town
Chris Shiflett is best known as a guitarist in Foo Fighters, but he's also has some authentic traditional country in his bones. Inspired, in part, by much of the fine vintage country music created in California, "West Coast Town" lets Shiflett show off his country music skills. »»»
Something's Going On CD review - Something's Going On
Trace Adkins' wonderful low singing voice can be a little deceptive because he could easily sing utter crap and still somehow sound great. It's why the critical ear must pay close attention to specifically what he's saying in his songs whenever evaluating his work. Adkins doesn't write his own songs, so he's entirely dependent upon stellar writers.  »»»
Patriots & Poets CD review - Patriots & Poets
From time to time an album comes along with exactly the right message and meaning at exactly the right time - "Patriots & Poets" is one of those albums. Dailey and Vincent initially set out to create a project full of songs they had written independently, together and with close friends. While succeeding mightily in that regard, they also created a beautiful love letter to America and her people... »»»
WildHorse CD review - WildHorse
Someone needs to inform karma that Raelynn is not getting what she deserves. It takes a lot of work to mess this equation up: national TV exposure (from "The Voice"), a monster hit (2014's "God Made Girls") and famous friends who've practically adopted you (like Blake Shelton). This is all atop her twangy Texan charm and very capable singer/songwriter chops. »»»
Way Out West CD review - Way Out West
Marty Stuart's "Way Out West" is, in part, his tribute to the music of California. The title cut gets straight to the point with a psychedelic journey song, which is as much a warning against drug abuse as it is a physical trip to the golden state. "Time Don't Wait" alludes to much of the garage rock that came out of California '60s, and more specifically points back to The Byrds' heyday with its glorious jangling Rickenbacker guitar part.  »»»