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Jarosz builds up to new album

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 – Sarah Jarosz will release "Build Me Up From Bones," the third release from the 22-year-old artist on Oct. 1 via Sugar Hill Records.

"Build Me Up From Bones" was recorded in the midst of Jarosz's final semester at the New England Conservatory where she graduated with honors and touring. Following her mid-May graduation, she flew straight to Nashville to put the finishing touches on the album.

The Texas native penned 9 of 11 tracks, and while Jarosz previously tended to write and sing in third person narratives, her new material connects in a much more personal way. She also covers Joanna Newsom's Book of Right-On and Bob Dylan's Simple Twist of Fate.

Gary Paczosa co-produced the disc. The recording included Alex Hargreaves (fiddle) and Nathaniel Smith (cello) with whom Jarosz has been touring with since 2010. As the recording progressed, other guests were added, including Dan Dugmore, Darrell Scott and Chris Thile.

Upcoming tour dates are:
June 21-22 - Telluride, CO - Michael D. Palm Theatre
July 6 - Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival
July 7- Quincy, CA - High Sierra Music Festival
July 11 - Tupelo, MS - Down on Main Street
July 13 - Louisville, KY - Forecastle Festival
July 18 - Missoula, MT - Top Hat Lounge
July 20 - Alta, WY - Targhee Fest
July 25 - Northampton, MA - Iron Horse Music Hall
July 26 - Hiram, ME - Ossipee Valley Music Festival 7-27- Newport, RI - Newport Folk Festival
July 28 - Ogunquit, ME - Jonathan's Restaurant
Aug. 10 - Portland, OR - Oregon Zoo Amphitheatre 8-11 - Seattle, WA - Woodland Park Zoo Amphitheatre
Sept. 7 - Charlottesville, VA - Monticello
Sept. 20 - North Adams, MA - Fresh Grass Festival
Sept. 28 - Hamilton, OH - Parrish Auditorium
Oct. 10 - Ann Arbor, MI - The Ark
Oct. 12 - Stoughton, WI - Stoughton Opera House
Oct. 20 - Johnson City, TN - Mountain Stage D.P. Culp University Center
Nov. 7 - Austin, TX - Paramount Theatre (with the Milk Carton Kids)
Nov. 9 - Fischer, TX - Rice Festival

More news for Sarah Jarosz

CD reviews for Sarah Jarosz

Build Me Up From Bones CD review - Build Me Up From Bones
Aging has worked wonders for Sarah Jarosz because she sounds better and better with each release. On her third disc, the Texas native, who occupies a musical turf straddling bluegrass, country and acoustic music, Jarosz proves to be more confident than ever in her vocal delivery. There's some bite in Fuel the Fire with a lot of banjo, courtesy of Jarosz herself, plucking going on all around here. Jarosz shines on the pared down, low key take on Dylan's Simple Twist of Fate with a »»»
Follow Me Down CD review - Follow Me Down
For those of us who have been around long enough to remember browsing through long racks of LPs at the local record store (remember them?), one of the oldest tricks in evaluating an album from a new, unknown artist is to scan the liner notes to see who the sidemen are - the principle being, you can judge an artist by the company he or she keeps. In the CD age, that's not always possible since the credits are often shrink-wrapped away on the inside, but in the case of Sarah Jarosz, it's a »»»
Songs Up in Her Head CD review - Songs Up in Her Head
The buzz around Sarah Jarosz is bound to focus on a few noteworthy points, but those facts could unjustly overshadow her work. The CD deserves to sink or swim on it's own merit. Don't worry - it swims, all right. It does the butterfly, the backstroke, and might even invent a new stroke. The CD is a masterful collection of songs written by Jarosz with the exception of two tasteful covers thrown in, most notably an eery version of The Decemberists' Skankill Butchers. »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Not playing the hit proves no problem for Bingham – Ryan Bingham may always end up being best known for collaborating with T Bone Burnett on the soundtrack for the 2009 film starring Jeff Bridges, particularly "The Weary Kind." That would not be a surprise given that he won a Grammy and Oscar for the song. One would, therefore, think that "The Weary Kind" would be one of those... »»»
Concert Review: Abbott brings the joy - even with "Front Row Seat" – To say that the Josh Abbott Band's "Front Row Seat" is an easy listen, especially in concert, would be a tremendous understatement. The Texas country singer released a five-act recording about the development, joy and ultimate dissolution of his marriage last fall. Not exactly easy subject matter, but Abbott managed to bring more than a... »»»
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