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Deer Tick aims for "Negatvity"

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 – Deer Tick will release its fifth full-length studio disc, "Negativity," on Sept. 24 on Partisan Records.

The release is the follow-up to 2011's "Divine Providence." The lead track on the new disc, The Rock, has just premiered exclusively at Rolling Stone. In addition, a pyrotechnic album teaser video can be viewed HERE.

The band includes front man John McCauley, guitarist Ian O'Neill, bassist Christopher Dale Ryan, keyboardist Rob Crowell and drummer Dennis Ryan. Recorded earlier this year in Portland, Ore. with producer/musician Steve Berlin (The Blasters, Los Lobos, and last year's McCauley side project, Diamond Rugs), the album is McCauley's most personal work.

"Negativity" was penned over the course of 2012, which saw McCauley's father plead guilty to federal charges of conspiracy and tax fraud, ultimately leading to a prison sentence and his engagement collapse "under the weight of his own excessive behavior and impossible lifestyle," according to his publicist.

The music includes Hey Doll and In Our Time, a country tearjerker featuring duet vocals from McCauley's good friend, singer/songwriter Vanessa Carlton.

The band also will be hitting the road. Dates include:
July 6 - Portsmouth, NH - Sneakers and Speakers Benefit
July 7 - Norfolk, CT - Infinity Hall
July 26-28 - Newport, RI - Newport Blues Café - sold out
Sept. 7 - Boston, MA - Boston Calling Festival
Sept. 17 - York, PA - Strand Performing Arts Center
Sept. 18 - Baltimore, MD - Ottobar
Sept. 20 - Morgantown, WV - 123 Pleasant Street
Sept. 21 - Bristol, TN - Bristol Rhythm & Roots Festival
Sept. 26 - Los Angeles, CA - UCLA - Bruin Plaza
Oct. 1 - London, UK - The Borderline
Oct. 2 - Brussels, Belgium - Botanique Rotonde
Oct. 3 - Amsterdam, Netherlands - Paradiso - Upstairs
Oct. 4 - Berlin, Germany - Comet Club

More news for Deer Tick

CD reviews for Deer Tick

Vol. 1 CD review - Vol. 1
John McCauley's earliest explorations as Deer Tick found him with one foot firmly planted in his punk rock past and the other in his newly minted conversion to folk and country by way of an introduction to Hank Williams. His dual personalities were separated into his studio Jekyll and his stage Hyde, the former using the solemnity of recording to craft quiet folk gems, the latter presenting them to an audience with adrenalized, amps-to-11 abandon. It wasn't until 2011's "Divine »»»
Vol. 2 CD review - Vol. 2
John McCauley's earliest explorations as Deer Tick found him with one foot firmly planted in his punk rock past and the other in his newly minted conversion to folk and country by way of an introduction to Hank Williams. His dual personalities were separated into his studio Jekyll and his stage Hyde, the former using the solemnity of recording to craft quiet folk gems, the latter presenting them to an audience with adrenalized, amps-to-11 abandon. It wasn't until 2011's "Divine »»»
Negativity CD review - Negativity
On their fifth album, Deer Tick, the Providence, R.I. band Deer Tick that got its start in 2004, once again demonstrates its tremendous musical range and canny songwriting in a set of tunes that explores absence in its many forms - the loss that comes with a breakup (Just Friends, and most songs), the loss of a parent to the prison system (Mr. Sticks) and the blankness of facing a world emptied of any meaning (Big House). The album's opening track, The Rock opens with a ghostly, echoing »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Strumbellas master its formula – The Strumbellas' formula is a simple one - write an anthemic sounding sing-a-long with a catchy chorus, which you can repeat ad nauseum to greater and greater effect. That may sound like a quick and easy checklist, but the Canadian (well except for one lone American) band has mastered the formula quite well. In a sold-out concert, it translated... »»»
Concert Review: Josh Abbott Band supplies antidote – Shortly after the Josh Abbott Band finished its open song, "The Night is Ours," band leader Abbott proclaimed, "That's our theme song this year." Presumably Abbott was referring to the playing music and having a good time because if he was referring to the lines "Life is good, love is great/Friends are there, and the... »»»
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