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Rucker tells his story

Monday, June 10, 2013 – "Songtellers with Darius Rucker: The Story of True Believers" premierer\s Thursday, June 20 at 10 p.m. eastern on Great American Country.

Filmed at Nashville's Belcourt Theatre, Rucker shares the stage with each of the co-writers from his just-released chart-topping LP, "True Believers," and before they perform their collaboration, share inside stories and jokes about their writing process.

"Back in the Hootie days all the songs I wrote, I wrote by myself. I used to think I had to be inspired to write something and I learned in Nashville that you can write whenever you want," said Rucker.

"This record is so much my life. Either the life I'm living now or the life I have lived or the life I want to live," Rucker said before performing Radio, a song about the time when car radio was king, with writers Luke Laird and Ashley Gorley. All-star songwriters appearing in the 60-minute special include Rucker's producer Frank Rogers (Miss You), Dallas Davidson and Rhett Akins (Heartbreak Road), Bob DiPiero (Lie To Me), Phillip White and Mark Nesler (Lost In You) and Josh Kear (True Believers, I Will Love You Still). Artist Mallary Hope joins Rucker on stage, providing vocals on I Will Love You Still.

Rucker's two-week number one hit, Wagon Wheel (Bob Dylan, Ketch Secor) was the finale with all the songwriters on stage for a group sing. "When we were playing and I was looking around, I couldn't count the number ones from the guys that were on that stage, and it was just deep to realize that all those guys took their time to write with me."

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CD reviews for Darius Rucker

Southern Style CD review - Southern Style
Although opener "Homegrown Honey" has a few hip-hip sonic elements fueling it, "Southern Style" is a fairly traditional - well, as traditional as Darius Rucker can get - album. "Homegrown Honey," along with the title cut and "Half Full Dixie Cup," make a play for Rucker's Southern credentials, and for the most part support these claims. Rucker is an easygoing vocalist, and this latest effort goes down smoothly. It's still taboo for country »»»
Home for the Holidays CD review - Home for the Holidays
When it came time for Darius Rucker to throw his hat into the holiday album ring, he was clearly aiming for the old school, traditional realm of such things. The heavy orchestration for these 12 songs hearkens back to the days when crooners like Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra tracked Christmas projects, rather than anything that might pass for country. With that said, though, Rucker represents himself quite well with this traditional album of (mostly) familiar Christmas songs. »»»
True Believers CD review - True Believers
Darius Rucker remains a great singer. He still has that smiling South Carolina party boy delivery that made him Hootie The Hitmaker. His guitarist, J.T. Corenflos, knows how to knock out a solo or two and his producer, Frank Rogers, does admirable work surrounding D-Ruck's voice with just the right amount of compression. So why is this the front runner for Most Boring Country Album of 2013? Well, for starters, the songs suck. The lyrics are so insipid they make the dialogue from a Hannah »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Avett Brothers come home – For the 30th anniversary of the "Traditional Plus" MerleFest music festival, there might not be a more appropriate act to anchor the opening night than the Avett Brothers. Born of a desire to bring rock 'n' roll energy to traditional music and formed by devotees to Doc Watson, The Avetts may have outgrown their acoustic roots over... »»»
Concert Review: Turnpike Troubadours leave no doubt – Turnpike Troubadours have not released an album since mid-September 2015. Don't look for any new release hitting the streets any day now either. The last time the Oklahoma-based band played Boston, they were in a pretty, 1,200-seat theatre. So, one could have been outwardly skeptical about the band when it downsized to a venue on the outskirts... »»»
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Trace Adkins' wonderful low singing voice can be a little deceptive because he could easily sing utter crap and still somehow sound great. It's why the critical ear must pay close attention to specifically what he's saying in his songs whenever evaluating his work. Adkins doesn't write his own songs, so he's entirely dependent upon stellar writers.  »»»
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