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Rucker tells his story

Monday, June 10, 2013 – "Songtellers with Darius Rucker: The Story of True Believers" premierer\s Thursday, June 20 at 10 p.m. eastern on Great American Country.

Filmed at Nashville's Belcourt Theatre, Rucker shares the stage with each of the co-writers from his just-released chart-topping LP, "True Believers," and before they perform their collaboration, share inside stories and jokes about their writing process.

"Back in the Hootie days all the songs I wrote, I wrote by myself. I used to think I had to be inspired to write something and I learned in Nashville that you can write whenever you want," said Rucker.

"This record is so much my life. Either the life I'm living now or the life I have lived or the life I want to live," Rucker said before performing Radio, a song about the time when car radio was king, with writers Luke Laird and Ashley Gorley. All-star songwriters appearing in the 60-minute special include Rucker's producer Frank Rogers (Miss You), Dallas Davidson and Rhett Akins (Heartbreak Road), Bob DiPiero (Lie To Me), Phillip White and Mark Nesler (Lost In You) and Josh Kear (True Believers, I Will Love You Still). Artist Mallary Hope joins Rucker on stage, providing vocals on I Will Love You Still.

Rucker's two-week number one hit, Wagon Wheel (Bob Dylan, Ketch Secor) was the finale with all the songwriters on stage for a group sing. "When we were playing and I was looking around, I couldn't count the number ones from the guys that were on that stage, and it was just deep to realize that all those guys took their time to write with me."

More news for Darius Rucker

CD reviews for Darius Rucker

True Believers CD review - True Believers
Darius Rucker remains a great singer. He still has that smiling South Carolina party boy delivery that made him Hootie The Hitmaker. His guitarist, J.T. Corenflos, knows how to knock out a solo or two and his producer, Frank Rogers, does admirable work surrounding D-Ruck's voice with just the right amount of compression. So why is this the front runner for Most Boring Country Album of 2013? Well, for starters, the songs suck. The lyrics are so insipid they make the dialogue from a Hannah »»»
Charleston, SC 1966 CD review - Charleston, SC 1966
It's a nifty trick to sell more than 20 million records over the course of 20 years, and follow it all with a CMA for New Artist of the Year. But Darius Rucker's career has defied convention more than once. There was a time in the '90s that Rucker's rich baritone, fronting Hootie and the Blowfish, was inescapable on mainstream radio. And with 2008's "Learn to Live", his country debut, he caught lightning in a bottle again: a number 1 record and 4 hit singles. »»»
Learn to Live CD review - Learn to Live
Darius Rucker is making the plunge into country after years spent leading Hootie & the Blowfish. Unlike some others who enter the country field late in their music life, Rucker attempts at times to keep a country sound. That is particularly true on "All I Want," although the tonker would have been best handled by someone like Dwight Yoakam since Rucker comes off as more of a dabbler than a dyed in the wool traditionalist. Rucker's voice is his strong suit. He always has had a very »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: No wonder life is good for Shovels & Rope – Things are go swimmingly - pun intended - for Shovels & Rope, the South Carolina-based duo comprised of husband-and-wife Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent. For starters, their new disc, "Swimmin' Time," debuted at 21 on the Billboard Top 200 in its first week just a few shot weeks ago. On the local front, the band was playing two... »»»
Concert Review: Americana fest moves beyond borders – It's the final night of the 2014 Americana Festival and Conference, and the final event of a spectacular five-day run. Lucinda Williams is about to begin a last minute invitation-only performance at the newly opened City Winery in Nashville, but first, Americana Music Association Executive Director Jed Hilly walks to the microphone.... »»»
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