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Gill, Franklin pay tribute to Buck, The Hag with new CD

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 – Vince Gill and steel guitarist Paul Franklin, announced Wednesday the release of "Bakersfield" on July 30 via MCA Nashville. Gill and Franklin pay tribute to the "Bakersfield" sound by performing songs from two of Bakersfield's sons; Buck Owens and Merle Haggard.

Gill and Franklin share the producing duties on the 10-song set. The disc was tracked in two days at Gill's home studio andbacked by John Hobbs, piano; Greg Morrow, drums; Willie Weeks and Brad Albin, bass; J. T. Corenflos, electric rhythm guitar; and Time Jumpers Kenny Sears, Larry Franklin, Joe Spivey, fiddles and Dawn Sears on harmony vocals. Gill played all the acoustic and electric guitar fills and solos.

"This is just as much a guitar record for me as it is a singing record," Gill said, "But it was fun for me to sing a whole record of the greatest songs ever. I guess what I'm real proud of is that when it's one of Buck's songs, I sing it very much in that vein. And the Haggard songs are very much in the vein he sang. With Buck's songs, you won't find much vibrato in my vocals, and with Merle's, it will come down to a low note and that quiver."

"This may be Vince's greatest project," Franklin said. "What a showcase. I've heard him sing for 30 years, but he sings licks on this record I never heard before."

Haggard, who wrote the albums liner notes, said, "Vince and Paul offer a great new touch on a great old sound. It was great, certainly to hear my music done with the great touch of Vince and Paul. I feel highly complimented. But it was especially great to hear what they did with Bucks stuff. Some may not notice, but I for one knew how great Buck really was, first as a musician, then as an artist."

"I can only give the entire project a big ole double, thumbs up," he said. "Well done guys, the West Coast takes a bow."

Songs are:
1. Foolin' Around Buck Owens (Written by Harlan Howard and Buck Owens)
2. Branded Man Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
3. Together Again Buck Owens (Written by Buck Owens)
4. The Bottle Let Me Down Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
5. He Don't Deserve You Anymore Buck Owens (Written by Arty Lange and Buck Owens)
6. I Can't Be Myself Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)
7. Nobody's Fool But Yours Buck Owens (Written by Buck Owens)
8. Holding Things Together Merle Haggard (Written by Bob Trotten and Merle Haggard)
9. But I Do Buck Owens (Written by Tommy Collins)
10. The Fightin' Side Of Me Merle Haggard (Written by Merle Haggard)

More news

CD reviews

Down to My Last Bad Habit CD review - Down to My Last Bad Habit
At this point in his career, Vince Gill could just as well have entitled this "Tried and True." He's not chasing trends - pop country or bro country - of chart-geared songs. He's too old for that, and at this point anyway, Gill knows what works for him. And there is quite a lot that works on his first solo album since 2011's "Guitar Slinger." (He did release the excellent "Bakersfield" with Paul Franklin in 2013). Gill prefers a more soulful approach, »»»
Guitar Slinger CD review - Guitar Slinger
It's hard to believe, considering what Vince Gill has accomplished over the past three decades, but the triple threat singer-songwriter-guitar picker may be in the most creative, productive stretch of his lengthy, remarkable career. Five years after Gill's Grammy-winning 4-album 43-song box set "These Days," his latest 12-song release again finds Gill tapping every ounce of his immense talents. The title song sums up his reputation as an ax man worthy of playing Eric »»»
Working in Tennessee CD review - Working in Tennessee
Read Merle Haggard's Wikipedia entry. It talks, in the second sentence, of his having helped create the Bakersfield sound, with its "rough edge." Later, it discusses, at some length, his conservative touchstones, in particular Okie From Muskogee. While, in Wikipedia fashion, that may capture the popular perception of the recent Kennedy Center honoree, it doesn't hit at the core of what made him, along with Willie Nelson and George Jones, one of country music's three most »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Ex-Brooklyn girl MIchaela Anne makes good – Brooklyn may not exactly have been enough of a hotbed of country music for Michaela Anne. Thus, about 1- years ago, she packed up her belongings with her husband (and drummer) Aaron Shafer-Haiss and headed for Nashville. Except, they headed to East Nashville more precisely where the rep is that the cooler country cats are hanging.... »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
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