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Underwood's Blown Away Tour gets DVD treatment

Friday, May 31, 2013 – Carrie Underwood will bring her just ended Blown Away Tour to DVD with the Aug. 13 release of "The Blown Away Tour: LIVE."

Filmed in concert this past March in Ontario, Cal. the release features more than 20 songs, with performances of a dozen of Underwood's number one singles, including and the album title track that inspired her tour name, Blown Away.

Alongside nearly 100 minutes of performance footage will be bonus clips offering a behind-the-scenes look into the making of the tour, including interviews with Underwood and Raj Kapoor, the tour director responsible for the large production and effects that defined the remarkable visual elements of The Blown Away Tour. Among the additional content is a selection of music videos from Underwood's Platinum-certified "Blown Away" album.

The tour launched in the spring of 2012 and continued through May 23 for a total of 112 dates in 110 cities, 6 countries and 3 continents, playing for more than 1 million fans and selling out every concert this year.

By the numbers, the stage production included 575,424 individual LED lights in 3,000 square feet of video walls and 23,063 feet of cable to generate the 172 different colors used in the show's lighting. As part of each show, Underwood and her band flew 150 feet above the audience at a speed of .3 feet per second on a secondary stage that weighed 5,890 pounds, while a total of 450 carbon dioxide and 222 nitrogen tanks were used during the life of the tour to create the "Blown Away" tornado effect at each performance.

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Greatest Hits: Decade #1 CD review - Greatest Hits: Decade #1
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Blown Away CD review - Blown Away
Carrie Underwood's calling card remains intact - her ultra strong set of pipes. "Blown Away" is almost a tale of two CDs. The first half or so tends to be far more pop oriented and at times rocks, while the other half veers far more towards country and even gets traditional on a song or two. The lead-off hit first single, Good Girl, rocks far more than anything else. It sounds good, catchy, but with Underwood singing hard, the song is geared for arena rock, not anything remotely »»»
Play On CD review - Play On
Through three releases, the one constant about Carrie Underwood is her big voice. It's an instrument in and of itself no matter whether going for somewhat of a country sound, a pure pop bent or a tougher, rocking edge. She can add the right touch to sad songs such as Temporary Home in part about a young boy who has to shuffle from home to home or the tough sounding Quitter. Underwood would not be accused of being heavy-duty country. She actually displayed more signs of that on her last CD, »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Long wait ends for Kitty, Daisy & Lewis – When you don't show for almost six years - Kitty, Daisy & Lewis are guilty as charged - and barely release any music unless counting one excellent disc out in late March on a British label and something almost unheard in the states in 2011, don't expect the masses to show up either. Predictably, that didn't happen for the family band... »»»
Concert Review: Mellencamp overcomes conundrum – John Mellencamp faces the predicament that artists of his stature must face as they age. Now 63 and still putting out new, quality albums, Mellencamp presumably wants to push his new highly relevant music, while the faithful, long-time supporters thrive on the old stuff. How do you rectify the two? Mellencamp tended to have it both ways before a... »»»
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