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Rucker leads Billboard songs chart, Shelton debut at top of album chart

Thursday, April 4, 2013 – Darius Rucker sits atop the Billboard Country Songs chart with Wagon Wheel, taking over for Blake Shelton's Sure Be Cool If You Did, which fell to second for the week ending April 13. On the album chart, Shelton was debuted in first with "Based on a True Story." He took over for newcomer Kacey Musgraves' debut "Same Trailer Different Park," which fell to seventh.

On the song chart, Lady Antebellum was third with Downtown, one ahead of Miranda Lambert's Mama's Broken Heart. Florida Georgia Line was fifth again with Get Your Shine On. Thompson Square went from 10 to 7 with If I Didn't Have You. FGL also was up three, to eighth, with Cruise.

Jason Aldean jumped from 20 to 13 with 1994. Shelton's new single, Boys 'Round Here, featuring Pistol Annies (which includes Lambert) and Friends, skyrocketed from 44 to 15 in its second week out.

Kip Moore's new single, Hey Pretty Girl, climbed 5 spots to 22nd.

On the albums chart, Alan Jackson debuted in second with "Precious Memories: Volume II," a collection of religious songs. Luke Bryan was third with "Spring Break...Here to Party." Thompson Square debuted in fourth with "Just Feels Good." Taylor Swift was fifth with "Red."

Bryan's "tailgates & tanlines," was eighth, up three. The compilation "Official 2013 Academy Of Country Music Awards 'ZinePak" debuted in 11th. Maggie Rose debuted at 36 with "Cut to Impress." Every other album between 11 and 40 was the same or mainly down except for the "Nashville" TV show soundtrack, which was up 1 to 22.

On the Bluegrass Albums chart, Steven Curtis Chapman remained first with "Deep Roots." Old Crow Medicine Show was second again with "Carry Me Back." Punch Brothers jumped from 10 to 3 with "Who's Feeling Young Now?" The Gibson Brothers debuted in fourth with "They Called It Music," one ahead of Russell Moore & IIIrd Tyme Out's "Timeless Hits From the Past: Bluegrassed."

On the overall top 200, Shelton debuted in 3rd, Jackson 5th, Bryan 12th, Thompson Square 13th and Swift 20th.

More news for Darius Rucker

CD reviews for Darius Rucker

Southern Style CD review - Southern Style
Although opener "Homegrown Honey" has a few hip-hip sonic elements fueling it, "Southern Style" is a fairly traditional - well, as traditional as Darius Rucker can get - album. "Homegrown Honey," along with the title cut and "Half Full Dixie Cup," make a play for Rucker's Southern credentials, and for the most part support these claims. Rucker is an easygoing vocalist, and this latest effort goes down smoothly. It's still taboo for country »»»
Home for the Holidays CD review - Home for the Holidays
When it came time for Darius Rucker to throw his hat into the holiday album ring, he was clearly aiming for the old school, traditional realm of such things. The heavy orchestration for these 12 songs hearkens back to the days when crooners like Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra tracked Christmas projects, rather than anything that might pass for country. With that said, though, Rucker represents himself quite well with this traditional album of (mostly) familiar Christmas songs. »»»
True Believers CD review - True Believers
Darius Rucker remains a great singer. He still has that smiling South Carolina party boy delivery that made him Hootie The Hitmaker. His guitarist, J.T. Corenflos, knows how to knock out a solo or two and his producer, Frank Rogers, does admirable work surrounding D-Ruck's voice with just the right amount of compression. So why is this the front runner for Most Boring Country Album of 2013? Well, for starters, the songs suck. The lyrics are so insipid they make the dialogue from a Hannah »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest Day 3: it's homecoming day – A wet and overcast day did little to dampen the spirits of the artists or the audience at MerleFest on Saturday; typically the busiest day of the four-day long festival. With home-state heroes The Avett Brothers headlining the Watson Stage, it felt like a homecoming celebration all day long. Friday may have been the day for new talent to shine, but... »»»
Concert Review: MerleFest: the new generation arrives – Friday at MerleFest is when things really get rolling; it is the first full day of music and this year it seemed the crowds were there early and often, perhaps to get some good tunes in before the forecasted rain hits on Saturday. The Stray Birds kicked things off down at the cozy Creekside stage, with an entertaining and energetic early morning set.... »»»
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