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Coe hospitalized after car crash

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 – David Allan Coe was hospitalized in non-critical condition in Tuesday after his SUV crashed into a semi-trailer in Ocala, Fla. early Tuesday morning. Coe cancelled shows in Louisville, Ky. and Scheller, Ill.

Reports said that Coe went through a red light in his 2011 Chevrolet Suburban at about 1:30 a.m., and his vehicle was hit by a tractor-trailer carrying produce. The driver of the trailer and a passenger were hospitalized with the passenger released.

Coe apparently was going from a casino in Tampa to a home in Ormond Beach, Fla. where he played on Sunday.

CD reviews for David Allan Coe

Penitentiary Blues CD review - Penitentiary Blues
This 1969 debut was recorded shortly Coe's release from 20 years of off-and-mostly-on incarceration. The last stretch, three years at Marion, provided many of the images and experiences essayed here, as well as the attitudes and strategies that insulated Coe from relapse. Though recorded in Nashville, this is an outlaw blues album whose hard-time lyrics are sung as basic bar music with a lineup of guitar, bass, drums and harmonica. Coe's prisoners are trapped between their oppressed prison lives »»»
Recommended For Airplay
David Allan Coe shows that he is still a versatile and talented songwriter on his first studio album for Lucky Dog. He can write drinking songs ("Drink My Wife Away," "Drink Canada Dry") without being stupid. He can write funny songs ("Songs For the Year 2000," "A Harley Someday") without being corny. He can write reflective songs ("The Price We'll Have to Pay," "In My Life") without being overly sentimental. Co-produced with one-half of the twangtrust, Ray Kennedy, Coe wrote all 11 songs on the album. »»»
Live! If That Ain't Country...
When Sony created an "alternative country" label and announced Coe as the first signing, hoots of derision were heard from the people who think the genre was invented by Uncle Tupelo. A guy who had some huge hit singles in the seventies, and wrote "Take This Job And Shove It," could only be considered 'alternative' by a major corporation out of touch with reality. The truth is that if anyone can lay claim to "inventing" alternative country, it's David Allan Coe. His small commercial success is a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: The Jayhawks remain in top form – It's usually a good time to catch a band right after they've released one of their better albums, and "Paging Mr. Proust" is one of The Jayhawks' best. Comprised of smart songs, which consistently put lead singer Gary Louris' engaging vibrato to proper use and instrumental textures that oftentimes stretch the Minnesota act... »»»
Concert Review: Alabama Shakes, Elvis celebrate music – Donald Trump was nowhere to be seen at the final day of the Newport Folk Festival, but that didn't mean he was ignored. Maybe it was the political roots of folk music. The Republican presidential candidate was mentioned at least three times - all by foreign musicians - during the finale. No one exactly endorsed his candidacy either.... »»»
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