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Dailey & Vincent ride the Highway in May

Monday, March 11, 2013 – Dailey & Vincent will release their sixth studio album, "Brothers Of The Highway," on May 7.

The disc is the follow-up to "The Gospel Side of Dailey & Vincent" features a pair of original Jamie Dailey compositions and covers of 10 songs cut by Vince Gill, the Louvin Brothers, Kathy Mattea, Bill Monroe, Cody Shuler & Pine Mountain Railroad, George Strait, and Porter Wagoner.

Jamie Dailey (voice and guitar) said, "I am extremely passionate about this album. It is a reflection of my heart, my soul, and my love for great music. When it was time to record this album, Darrin (Vincent) and I knew exactly what we wanted it to be. We both agreed that it was time to record a straight-ahead bluegrass record consisting of a blend of original songs and songs from the past that we absolutely love. We know where we came from, and we know where we want to go. We feel this record is in step with our musical dreams, and we are excited for people to hear it!"

"Brothers Of The Highway" has been a labor of love for us," sasid Vincent. "We wanted to make an album about the joys of a simple way of life and tell stories through descriptive lyrics about friends, family, and love. I am so proud of this album. From the bottom of my heart, I hope you enjoy these songs as much as we enjoyed performing them for you."

Since starting in 2007, Dailey & Vincent have won three consecutive IBMA (International Bluegrass Music Association) Awards for Entertainer of the Year and Vocal Group of the Year, respectively; 2 Grammy nominations, and the 2011 Dove Award for Bluegrass Album of the Year.

Dailey & Vincent's lineup includes the mandolin playing and lead and harmony vocals of Jeff Parker, banjo player Jessie Baker, fiddler B.J. Cherryholmes, and bass singer Christian Davis.

Johnny Beller (Dobro), Molly Cherryholmes (fiddle), Mike Compton (mandolin), Joe Dean (banjo), Jimmy Fortune (voice), Andy Leftwich (fiddle, mandolin, mandocello), and Bryan Sutton (guitar) played on the album.

Songs are:

1. Steel Drivin' Man (Jamie Dailey)

2. Close By (Bill Monroe/Van Winkle)

3. When I Stop Dreaming (Charlie Louvin/Ira Louvin)

4. Back To Jackson County (Jamie Dailey)

5. Brothers Of The Highway (Doug Johnson/Nicole Witt/Kim Williams)

6. Tomorrow I'll Be Gone (Wilma Lee Cooper)

7. Hills Of Caroline (Vince Gill)

8. Big River (James Cody Shuler)

9. Howdy Neighbor Howdy (James C. Morris)

10. Won't It Be Wonderful There (Mildred Styles Johnson)

11. Back To Hancock County (Pete Goble/Leroy Drumm)

12. Where've You Been (Don Henry/Jon Vezner)

More news for Dailey & Vincent

CD reviews for Dailey & Vincent

Brothers of the Highway CD review - Brothers of the Highway
Some six years and counting after their spectacular debut on the bluegrass scene, with a couple of handfuls of IBMA awards garnered along the way, Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent continue to avoid the trap of sputtering out after using up their best material on the first couple of albums. The primary reason is, although they are adept at writing some of their own material (and two of the tracks on this new release, Steel Drivin' Man and Back To Jackson County are nice efforts by Dailey), »»»
The Gospel Side of Dailey & Vincent
It could be said that there are actually 2 gospel sides of Jamie Dailey and Darren Vincent presented on this 12-track collection. Having taken the bluegrass world by storm the last few years, it's not surprising that there's a healthy helping of hard-driving bluegrass gospel on the table, but like many raised with the music of Bill Monroe and his disciples, they're also steeped in the world of Southern gospel. Vincent grew up on stage alongside his sister Rhonda as part of the »»»
Dailey & Vincent Sing The Statler Brothers CD review - Dailey & Vincent Sing The Statler Brothers
In the 60's through the '80's, the Statler Brothers, Don and Harold Reid, Phil Balsley, Jimmy Fortune and the late Lew Dewitt, were the hottest thing going. They set the standard for modern country vocal groups with a style that earned them a worldwide fan base and entry into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Bluegrassers Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent do a great job of honoring their idols, covering classics like "Flowers On The Wall," "Bed of Roses," »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Lane oversees her queendom – When Nikki Lane rolled into town on her current Stagecoach Spotlight Tour, she and her touring mates were under the weather. Although illness didn't keep Lane performing (she was in fine voice throughout), Robert Ellis was a last-minute scratch. His replacement, Jenny O, was one high caliber fill-in, however, and kept the bill strong.... »»»
Concert Review: The Surly Gentlemen prove anything but – For about the past six months, veteran bluegrassers Clay Hess, formerly of Kentucky Thunder, and Tim Shelton of NewFound Road, along with Clay's son Brennan, have collectively been The Surly Gentlemen. The trio's sound is probably best described as stripped down bluegrass meets singer/songwriter. These Surly Gents have been playing small... »»»
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