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Montgomery Gentry, Rogers, Turner, Bentley join Jones Nashville stop

Monday, February 18, 2013 – Montgomery Gentry, Kenny Rogers, Josh Turner and Dierks Bentley are the latest additions to the final Nashville concert of George Jones' career.

Taking place at the Bridgestone Arena on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013, the show also includes Charlie Daniels, Lorrie Morgan, Randy Travis, Jamey Johnson and Gene Watson.

"I am excited that my friends all want to be with me on this show," said Jones. "This is sure going to be a fun and emotional night with lots of memories, friends and great country music."

Other dates on the tour, which Jones said would be his last, are:
Feb. 22 - Greenville, TX - Greenville Memorial Auditorium
Feb. 23 - Forrest City, AR - East Arkansas Community College
March 15 - Joliet, IL - Realto Square Theater
March 16 - Muncie, IN - Emens Auditorium
March 22 - Chattanooga, TN - Memorial Auditorium
March 23 - Evansville, IN - The Centre
April 5 - Fairfax, VA - Patriot Center
April 6 - Knoxville, TN - Knoxville Coliseum
April 19 - Atlanta, GA - Fox Theater
April 20 - Salem, VA - Salem Civic Center
April 27 - Huntsville, AL - Mark C. Smith Concert Hall
May 17 - Charlottesville, VA - John Paul Jones Arena
May 18 - Spartanburg, SC - Memorial Auditorium
June 1 - North Tonawanda, NY - Riviera Theater
June 2 - Lancaster, PA - American Music Theater
Aug. 2 - Columbus, OH - Ohio State Fair
Aug. 3 - Watertown, NY - Watertown Fairgrounds Arena
Sept. 13 - Biloxi, MS - IP Casino
Sept. 27 - Prior Lake, MN - Mystic Lake Casino
Sept. 28 - Milwaukee, WI - Potawatomi Casino
Oct. 11 - Branson, MO - The Mansion Theater
Oct. 25 - Mt. Pleasant, MI - Soaring Eagle Casino
Oct. 26 - Pikeville, KY - Eastern KY Expo
Nov. 9 - Grant, OK - Choctaw Event Center
Nov. 10 - Branson, MO - The Mansion Theater
Nov. 22 - Nashville - Bridgestone Arena

More news for George Jones

CD reviews for George Jones

The Hits CD review - The Hits
George Jones tends to rely on his past these days, so it's not surprising that "The Hits" is his new CD. The 24-song set does include a few previously unreleased songs, but that may not be enough to persuade all but the diehards to buy this. Jones recorded Eddy Raven's I Should Have Called and Al Anderson-Steven Bruton's I Ain't Ever Slowing Down about five years ago with Keith Stegall producing, and both appear here for the first time. The former is a bit poppy, »»»
Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology CD review - Step Right Up 1970-1979: A Critical Anthology
As retrospectives go, this new 28-track collection of George Jones' work from the 1970s is a bit of an anomaly. While most other compilations present chart-topping singles in chronological order, this single-disc set from the Australian reissue specialists at Raven Records provides an overview of Jones' total artistic output for the entire decade, regardless of chart position. This approach works well in this case because it covers songs not usually included on George Jones compilations. »»»
George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets CD review - George Jones: Burn Your Playhouse Down, the unreleased duets
There are few revelations in this George Jones duets collection culled primarily from "The Bradley Barn Sessions" (1993 recordings). Producers have their reasons. Perhaps the biggest surprise is when Jones is outsung by one of his duet partners, Georgette Jones, the only child of his marriage to Tammy Wynette. Georgette may have the best singing genes in history, but it is time as much as anything that pushes Dad into a subordinate role on You and Me and Time. The revelation, then, is a »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Hard Working Americans more than live up to moniker – Hard Working Americans is a generic enough sounding term, conveying that you're part of the lunch bucket crowd. Part of a faceless pack instead of an individual. In reality, it's something of a misnomer for the sextet of the same name heretofore considered a side project. That's because they or in most cases, their other... »»»
Concert Review: Wolf rolls on with ease – Peter Wolf starts off his first disc in six years, "A Cure for Loneliness," with "Rolling On." Great title for a song, and as he would prove in concert, he lived up to those words. The song starts "You can lay down and die / You can lay up and count the tears you've cried / But baby, that's not me / There's a... »»»
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